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Fancy A Butler While Camping?

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The great outdoors now come with all luxury trappings. Glamping offers comforts that, at times, exceed services provided by five-star hotels.


Tourism in Soweto, a township in the south west of Johannesburg in South Africa, has grown exponentially over the years, contributing millions to its economy. And with disposable incomes in such urban township economies increasing, more people are finding ways to spend money through means they historically didn’t have.

Thato Mothopeng is one of the few entrepreneurs in the tourism sector here without a formal degree or training, but has a roaring business nevertheless.

His passion for enterprise and fun made him pour all his savings into his startup, Ghetto Mentality Entertainment, which birthed four other products: the Township Small Business Showcase, an annual event showcasing township businesses to other businesses; a restaurant called Sanchos outdoor kitchen that’s a food and art kitchen; then the Soweto Tourism Association with a mandate to develop tourism businesses in Soweto, creating employment opportunities and skilling the youth; and last but not the least, the Soweto Camp Festival that has been running for seven years now.

“This is one of my difficult projects because you have to get everybody into the [singular] vision of creating an economy using our own products. I try and show that potential at the Soweto Camp Festival where I fuse small businesses together to render services for people coming to the festival,” Mothopeng says.

The festival happens every Easter, on the long weekend, boosting Soweto’s tourism prospects.

This year, the camp is offering free stalls to emerging businesses in the art, craft and fashion industries.

The festival started as Camp Chair Sessions, a weekend event promoting outdoor activities in 2010 prior to the Soccer World Cup, at Lebo’s Soweto Backpackers, 17kms from Johannesburg. In 2011, it was converted to the Soweto Camp Festival after guests wanted to camp with the hosts.

The Soweto Camp Chair Sessions encourage artists, entrepreneurs and people from different disciplines to promote the idea of camping, says loyal attendee and now the general manager of the Soweto Camp Festival, Kgomotso Morotolo.

“I met Thato at the camp chair sessions. At the sessions, we would have between 2,000 to 4,500 people coming with their camp chairs and it was housed at Lebo’s Backpackers. So, we were creating a lifestyle of traveling and camping, entrepreneurship and socializing,” Morotolo says.

 The first three festivals were hosted at the same venue where the sessions were held. Slowly, the camp site was getting smaller because of the sheer volume of attendees; Mothopeng had to look for another space.

Mothopeng and the owner of Lebo’s Soweto Backpackers, Lebo Malepa, had to part ways.

“Thato saw the bigger picture, one of the reasons we parted was because he wanted to go big and I wanted to go small. He was used to hosting big gigs and I’m not used to hosting such because I deal with tourists and tourists usually want smaller groups of people for the safety. That’s when we agreed that he can move on and he had a lot of ideas which he is including now in his package,” says Malepa.

Mothopeng was looking for something with sentimental value, a place that spoke to the inhabitants of the township, and in 2014, Mofolo Park, 3kms from the iconic Vilakazi Street seemed fitting. This is also where FORBES AFRICA is doing this interview, under one of the many trees, on a bench with the passionate entrepreneur who is wearing a colorful bucket hat; symbolic of a young Sowetan.

“When Nelson Mandela came back from prison and wanted to address students, he came to this park; the late jazz musician Hugh Masekela performed here, among others, this is a very historic space. That’s what we are trying to do, to revive the history because we also want to play a part in the making of history. We also want to be part of the history writers; we also want to talk about the greats within our time,”  Mothopeng says.

Their current venue is a source of pride.

“It’s a green site. This is a place where people get to come and relax, chill and unwind with nature; it’s something we don’t experience because of lack of greenery in the township. With that being said, we have over 100 trees in this venue.”

Running the venue and providing the best service is not without challenges.

“Having to convince City Parks [parks and zoos run by the City of Johannesburg] is a challenge and [upkeep] costs us about R100,000 ($6,900) to utilize for a weekend with toilets and fencing. It was stressful but at the end of the day we did it without a cent and we made a bit of money after that. Now I have a bit of a budget that I saved up for rainy days,” he says.

The festival has reached the 1,000 people mark from its inception when they hosted about 200 campers at Lebo’s Soweto Backpackers, and about 60% of them are non-Sowetans, accommodating  guests from Lesetho, Swaziland and America, among others. In 2018, the project made R1.4 million ($97,168), comprising youth-owned township businesses and service providers, and is targeting R2.5 million ($173,514) in 2019.

“I remember in 2017, we faced a loss because we were focusing on paying people we owed. We had a loss of about R250,000 ($17,351) in 2017. We had to chase that so we could recoup our name before 2018. With all the hard work, we left 2018 debtless,” he recalls.

Mothopeng attributes his growth as an entrepreneur to the many challenges he has faced along the way. Last year, their ticketing service provider went on strike for two weeks before the festival, which was detrimental for the team as it impacted negatively on sales. Since then, they have learned to take responsibility for their product by handling all bookings and ticket sales, and outsource if their work load was beyond their capacity.

The vision of the Soweto Camp Festival is to create a ripple effect where other city parks are used as camping parks like they do at Mofolo Park which showcases the history of Soweto, the artistry, culinary finesse, fashion and music. Moreover, the conventional forms of pitching a tent, starting a fire and hiding in a bush to relieve yourself, has evolved over time.

Glamping Gurus

Glamping, which is a combination of glamor and camping, provides people with all their creature comforts while also immersed in the great outdoors.

About 60kms from Mofolo Park in Soweto is a glamping farm in Magaliesburg in north Gauteng called Koesterfonteinfarm founded by Zai Khan, a coastal girl and beach lover who has been living in Johannesburg for 20 years.

“I worked in the media for 18 years until I decided I wanted to be an entrepreneur. I like being my own boss, I wanted that life and didn’t have an idea how I was going to carve it, so I bought a beautiful farm in Magaliesburg. My dad is a bee-keeper, he makes honey and thought I should continue my father’s legacy, I bought the farm to keep bees but it didn’t work because the farm didn’t have flora,” Khan says.

Although the farm was bought to continue a legacy, it is in the heart of an enterprising environment. Magaliesburg is home to the Cradle of Humankind, as well as Maropeng and the Sterkfontein caves, among other natural wonders. Magaliesburg serves as an escape from the city and is about an hour’s drive from Johannesburg.

 Tourists also make stops in the mountain range while heading to the North West Province which is home to Sun City, an upscale resort with hotels, a casino, and a water park in inland South Africa that borders Botswana.

Khan was stuck with a farm, and was unemployed, but selling fire wood she had found on the property. Not long after owning the property, she decided to branch into hospitality, a decision she regards as the best because travel companies had contacted her to do her marketing. She has been fully booked since.

“When I bought the property, it had a beautiful barn house, a rock cottage and a structured tent and I liked it [the tent], so [I thought] if I like it, someone else might like it. So, it started with a tent and I wanted people to experience what I had experienced, and that is how I found out about glamping,” she recalls.

Khan used a local artisan to refurbish the farm and give it an unruffled feel; she liked it so much that she is currently working on replicating two more because of the demand from guests. 

“The tent has a king-size bed. It’s like you’re sleeping in a tented structure but its an en suite, which has a shower, a bath, and a fire pit, [to keep] you warm when you’re inside. It’s cocoon-like and cosy, it has a delta gusto coffee machine and a kitchen. Everything is there and that’s what I went with it [glamping]. Now I have a lot of big companies copying the idea of glamping, that’s how I realized I’m onto something and stuck to it,” Khan says.

Khan’s plans are to grow the glamping industry in South Africa and become a “glamping guru”, a specialist in that field, she says.

“If the tourism industry is worth trillions, then the 1% of glamping is not a market to ignore, because it hasn’t reached its potential growth, there is so much potential to grow in it.”

Today Khan is a part of on  incubation program with flight centre, and is learning about hospitality as she doesn’t have a qualification. She is also sitting on the board of Cradle of Humankind Local Tourism Association to increase her knowledge of the tourism and hospitality sector.

Khan’s farm accommodates 12 people and is being expended  to house 20 people with an additional two tents. The property has 21 hectors of land and employs two people with a turnover of R250,000 in 2018.

“Glamping is a combination of glamor and camping, its where you get to experience the great outdoors without ever having to pitch a tent because we have the tent ready with 300 tread count linen, Le Creuset pots, a delta gusto coffee machine and everything is there ready and waiting. We have no Wi-Fi, but we promise you a better connection,” she says.

Glamping is a novelty and is a growing industry that’s exploring various ways to make the experience as convenient as possible. Ever imagined having a butler at your camp site?

Karabo Sepharatla is a 35-year-old from Soweto who runs a camping butler service he calls Camping Khapela; (khapela is a name taken from a character who was a butler in popular South African soapie, Generations).

“About five years ago, I went on a camping trip with the boys to a weekend music festival in Mozambique and it was a horrible experience. We had only bought alcohol and food and some of us couldn’t even set up tents so we’d sleep in other people’s tents, and we had cramps.

“I had invited other friends who do VIP protection and they had everything; the whole set up. What they did was hire a local guy to clean and look after their camp site and prepare food while they were out having fun. I thought to myself I would pay top dollar for that and city people would pay top dollar for that as well,” he says.

He went back home and did research on why many black people were not camping. “I found historical reasons because black people were not allowed to travel. Now that there is freedom, we don’t know where to go,” Sepharatla says.

On his return to Johannesburg, Sepharatla received a warning from work for skipping work but wasn’t bothered because he didn’t enjoy his job anyway. On the same day, he turned on the radio and they were talking about how black people didn’t camp. He called in and erroneously told them he provided a camping service as though the business already existed. A few minutes later, he a received a call; a gentleman and five of his friends wanted to go to Coffee Bay, in the Eastern Cape of South Africa over New Year 2014.

“I sent a quote in three days, the client paid a deposit and I bought my first tent, and I started from there. I didn’t make profit, but we managed to get everything that was needed. Improvements continued, and we started taking pictures for social media to promote our services and the black people market showed interest,” he says.

Sepharatla says when Camping Khapela started, there were only five service providers of such and currently there are six in Johannesburg doing the exact same thing.

“The turnover is good. In my first year, I made about R60,000 ($4,164) doing six trips and this year, we’re looking at a million rand. Our services cover the SADC region and we’re aiming to expand to Zanzibar and Uganda and take over the African continent, and share our secrets because it seems like no one is doing it,” he says.

Their services range from R2,000 ($139) to R5,000 ($347) on weekend services and prices vary depending on requirements.

“Camping Khapela is the ultimate camping experience it’s like having your own butler at the camp site 24/7 who will pitch a tent, prepare breakfast, lunch and dinner and make sure your site is clean, basically a Khapela at your camp site,” says Sepharatla.

Such experiences seem to have certainly given outdoor hospitality a new look.

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Executive Travel: Reneilwe Letsholonyane’s Manchester

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The 37-year-old South African soccer midfielder says he could move to the English city for its sense of serenity and calm.


South Africa’s former national football player Reneilwe ‘Yeye’ Letsholonyane started playing in the streets of Soweto but his fame has often taken him beyond the soccer pitches of South Africa.

Also a fashion entrepreneur and co-founder of the newly-established ShaYe lounge, the veteran midfielder recounts the indelible memories of his most recent holiday to Manchester with his wife, sports presenter Mpho Letsholonyane.

“In the off season of 2018, I had just gotten married. I personally love Jay-Z and my wife loves Beyoncé; and they were having their On The Run 2 tour in Manchester; a major city in the northwest of England.”

READ MORE | Executive Travel: Mpho Popps’ Ghana

Letsholonyane had also always wanted to go to Paris, a major European city and global center for art, fashion, food and culture, so flew to Manchester via the French capital.

The newly-weds spent a few days in Paris and thereon proceeded to Manchester for the concert, flying Air France on both sectors.

“Funnily enough, the economy class on Air France is not as squashed as the economy class on South African Airlines. You’d expect an uncomfortable flight, but that wasn’t the case. There was enough room to stretch your legs and recline your seat,” says the footballer.

Upon landing and clearing customs, a shuttle was waiting for the two to be chauffeured through the city to their hotel. The 40-minute drive was what the 37-year-old says he enjoyed the most. It made him reflect and draw comparisons between his home country and Europe.

At the age of 23, Letsholonyane’s professional career had kicked-started, but it was in 2008 that he joined one of South Africa’s biggest teams, the Kaizer Chiefs Football Club, for an eight-year stint.

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Receiving the call to represent Bafana Bafana for the 2010 World Cup was a moment he recalls vividly.

“We were at camp, and told to check out from the hotel and go home. We were to find out from the media, like other citizens, if we had been selected to play. I remember I was in the streets and didn’t want to focus on the media because I was nervous, panicking and excited.

“My parents broke the news to me, but there was more cheering in my hometown and outside my parent’s home. A soccer pitch and jersey with my number and surname were painted in the streets.”

It was a moment that led to fame and more travels. He flips back to Manchester, gushing about the city’s architecture as he was equally captivated by the serenity of the city and its mild-mannered people.

“The standalone houses are the kind you see on television, with no walls. People that side don’t seem to be worried about burglaries. It seems like the crime rate is low. It’s quiet and it’s the quiet that I like. I remember saying to my wife, ‘I could stay here’.” 

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Letsholonyane admits to seeking alone time to think and ruminate.

Ironically, for the footballer, the Beyoncé and Jay-Z concert was in the home of a football club.

Like all tourists, the couple traveled to Etihad Stadium, the home of Manchester City Football Club, where the musical extravaganza was to take place.

“We were told to use the train; luckily, it was a five-minute walk to the station. We got there but the people around us showed us what to do and where to go. We got off at a station, only to find out we had to wait for another train and it was packed. Then I started thinking about the hassle of getting into the stadium,” he says.

Letsholonyane and his wife dribbled their way through busy subways in Manchester to watch their favorite musicians on stage.

“Getting to Etihad Stadium was a pain-free experience. We got there early and people were idling outside. We went straight in and got seats in the front. There was no opening act, just the artists’ music playing.

Then the lights went dimmer and dimmer.

“It was time, we were about 10 meters away, and we saw them closely. Then it started raining. You’d think people would run for cover but no, people were just enjoying themselves. It was two and half hours of Beyoncé and Jay-Z and an experience never to be forgotten,” he says.

It was well after 1AM when the couple reached their hotel. “There was nothing that made us uncomfortable about walking the streets of Manchester at night. It felt like day.”

The night ended with rain, rounding off a day so different from playing under the hot African sun in the soccer fields of South Africa.

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No Longer In The Wilderness

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Meet the women challenging stereotypes deep in the bush in Botswana’s tourism capital Maun, filling roles conventionally held by men.


For 10 years, until 2018, Botswana had no First Lady, as President Ian Khama was unmarried. Botswana’s first First Lady, Ruth Williams Khama, the wife of Botswana’s first president Sir Seretse Khama, was recognized for her charitable work with women, and the current First Lady, Neo Masisi, is a champion for these causes too.

However, Masisi is also an accountant by profession with an MBA and an impressive resume (United Nations Headquarters in New York, United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and United Nations Integrated Peacebuilding Office in the Central African Republic).

But not just on the frontlines, in the deeper realms of this southern African country and acclaimed tourism destination, there are more women defying stereotypes, especially in its famed safari industry.

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In the country’s tourism capital of Maun, at Kwando Safaris, guests visiting the iconic Okavango Delta waterways and predator plains of the Central Kalahari might be surprised to discover that for over a decade, a majority team of women have been behind the operation.

“Having so many women work in the company was never a policy; it just happened that way. I guess that women were just more capable,” says Sue Smart in her office in Maun.

She talks about her role as the Director of Kwando Safaris for 12 years as an accidental occupation, but a gutsy corporate background primed her for the head position.

“Coming to Gaborone as a volunteer, I worked with children impacted by HIV/AIDS. Then I visited the Okavango Delta on holiday. A chain of life events eventually led to me working at Kwando Safaris’ Kwara Camp, volunteering back of house, in the kitchen, with housekeeping – anywhere they needed it.”

Ungwang Makuluba is Moremi Air’s first local female pilot. Picture: Melanie Van Zyl

Formerly a Director at PricewaterhouseCoopers, with a background in environmental biology, it was a chance meeting with the owner that saw her grow from volunteer to boss in just three months. “In many ways, I was not a conventional fit for this role. I’m not African, a pilot, a guide, or a man, but my background in other areas meant I could run a business – even in the bush.”

Having a woman at the helm has had significant side effects for the company. Many women at Kwando Safaris hold high positions, from the general manager to operations manager to those in reservations to sales and marketing. This unofficial head office policy also extends into the camps in a formal staff management plan, where each lodge has a male and a female camp manager always on duty. 

Looking at the origins of tourism in Botswana, it’s perhaps not surprising that (generally speaking) travel in southern Africa has been a male-dominated industry. After all, the very first visitors to Botswana’s wild spaces were rough and tough gun-slinging, trophy-seeking tourists.

The current CEO of Botswana Tourism is a woman and, attesting to the country’s progressiveness, she’s not the first either. Myra Sekgororoane is encouraging about women in the industry saying, “I have not encountered any significant challenges because of my gender. Perhaps, I have been lucky in that the hospitality and tourism industry tends to have a high predominance of females globally.”

READ MORE | Feisty And Fearless Pioneers Thandi Ndlovu & Nonkululeko Gobodo

According to National Geographic, research shows working women in developing countries invest 90% of their income in their families, compared to the 35% generally contributed by men.

Tumie Matlhware and Ruth Stewart, managers for Travel For Impact, wholeheartedly agree. The Maun-based NGO aims to spread the wealth generated from tourism activities into the community, providing a direct and tangible link between conservation and its benefits.

“We want tourism dollars working beyond the traditional tourism world,” says Stewart, when we meet for coffee at the charming Tshilli Farmstall, another female-run establishment in Maun.

Travel For Impact has a powerful goal, with the slogan of “If every tourist who slept in our beautiful country paid 1 USD for every night they spent here, we would raise in excess of 300,000 USD per year”.

By partnering with exclusive lodges, camps, tour operators and hotels in Botswana, funds generated are put into local community partners, such as support for basket-weaving cooperatives. Looking at the company profile, the NGO funds many projects that support women.

Stewart shares the scientific standpoint endorsed by National Geographic, saying: “Women are the backbone of the community. If you support women, it gets passed down. They buy food, school supplies and more. They are the pillars of society.” 

The corporate social responsibility choice at Kwando Safaris concurs. Smart believes that “the ultimate saviors of animals are people, which is why we sponsor the grassroots initiative, Mummy’s Angels, instead of a more usual conservation project”.

Mummy’s Angels started in April 2018, spearheaded by three women in Maun, to empower mothers with newborns who have little by way of financial support.

“We had second-hand clothes and other baby items in good condition and wanted to donate somewhere it would make a difference,” says one founder, Rochelle Katz.

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Executive Travel: Mpho Popps’ Ghana

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The 32-year-old South African comedian traveled to the West African country for some eye-opening experiences.


South African comedian, actor and entrepreneur, Mpho ‘Popps’ Modikoane, is a frequent traveler but ask him about his happy place and he says it’s a little corner of Africa named Ghana.

He has traveled overseas before, but it was his travels within Africa that opened his eyes to the magic of the continent, and made him realize that all Africans have the same stories and are essentially the same.

“It’s just these borders we were brought up [in that] we don’t take the time to learn about each other’s cultures and share each other’s stories,” says Modikoane.

“I’ve traveled to a lot of countries over the years and early on in my career, I was in the US. A few years ago, I went to Canada for the annual Just For Laughs international comedy festival and these places are amazing, but traveling in Africa has been the most eye-opening for me.”

Mpho ‘Popps’ Modikoane in Ghana. Picture: Supplied

 Modikoane’s career kick-started in 2009 on the reality TV show, So You Think You’re Funny? His growing audiences haven’t stopped laughing since.

With fame, came the chances to travel. His very first trip to West Africa was to Nigeria on Arik Air two years ago, when he flew business class.

“I don’t know what it is about us [black people], but when we don’t have things, we don’t see why it’s necessary – we don’t understand why we have to pay R30,000 ($2,000) for a seat, a leather seat,” he says, chuckling.

He goes on to elaborate with his trademark wit: “The seat is reclined all the way, we are drinking champagne in glasses; I didn’t even know there were glasses on planes…. Even forks and knives. And in business class, you don’t get shouted at by the attendants for reclining your seat four centimeters back, never! Even the magazines are not the same – we get business magazines and informative magazines. We even have a food menu with pages.”

That was his trip to Nigeria when on the ground, he was impressed by the hard work of the locals, the hustle and bustle of the streets and everything from bikes and Maybachs driving past him.

However, Ghana was his most memorable destination where he stayed five days.

“Ghana just looks beautiful and is next to Nigeria and they have this feud going on about who makes the best jollof rice and after tasting both, I have to give it up to Ghana,” says the comedian. 

What he also loved about Ghana was its orderliness, and the warmth of the people.

  What impressed Modikoane was that the people did not wait for the government to give them handouts and opportunities; the locals were willing to work hard to find them.

“The people there work outside of their work, have a business outside of their job and that’s the one thing I’ve come to realize about traveling in Africa. We [South Africans] are sitting in the land of opportunity but we are not working as hard as those from other parts of Africa. That is the magic of going to these places and spending time with other artists or musicians who also may have [on the side] their own clothing store, a restaurant, a barber shop…”

Mpho ‘Popps’ Modikoane in an interview in Ghana. Picture: Supplied

Modikoane juxtaposes his experiences in Ghana and South Africa, making various comparisons in the ways people conduct their lives. “When you go outside of South Africa, you see the Africanness of our continent. We South Africans have the modern, western element and live with white people in our communities and our country is not fully ours, but there, it’s theirs. Their heritage is rich, their culture is rich.”

And the most important part about visiting the rest of Africa for Modikoane?

“They make you feel like a celebrity,” he chuckles again. 


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Executive Travel: Nomzamo Mbatha’s Kenya

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