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A Serious Investment For A Funny Man

Published 3 years ago
By Melitta Ngalonkulu

How do you keep the crowd interested in your comedy?

Be honest, because they need to realize you are one of them.

What is your business strategy?

You need to be open to what is going on in the industry. There was a time where we were able to plan a year in advance, but we can’t do that anymore. Social media platforms are evolving so fast. You can’t drop the same images and messages on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. You have got to do it differently… So stay current and on top of things. It is also more than just about the technology; there are networking opportunities springing up.

What is your investment philosophy?

I am a conservative investor. I go for short-term investments rather than long-term investments. I would like to keep it to the medium range of risk.

Financial discipline means…?

Knowing when to say no, no matter how good it feels.

How do you remain financially disciplined?

I struggle a lot.

How have you diversified your investments?

I own a couple of classic cars. I also have a couple of properties.

Your most recent acquisition?

I bought a piece of property on Long Street, Cape Town.

You most regrettable financial blunder since you entered the industry?

Starting the comedy club! It was difficult making a concept like a comedy club work in a conservative space five years ago when I started.

However, it became the best decision I ever made. At the time, it was a huge investment of energy and time to get it started. On one or two occasions, I remember thinking this was too hard. It has been a very bitter-sweet thing but in the end, the advantages are huge and the disadvantages just as staggering…The theory of business is basically failure till you reach the point of success. But failure is a very important part of success. You can’t have the one without the other.

Kurt Schoonraad. Photo by Casey Bertie

How do you decide your fee?

My personal fee is affordable. I think it is important to stay within range. It is very easy to price yourself out of the [market]. We need to understand that the universe has not made all comedians equal. My fee is about R35,000 ($2,600) for a 45 minute-to-an hour set.

How much is it to start a comedy club and what does it entail?

More money than you know how to come up with but you figure it out. It is [just] one of those things. There was no comedy club in Cape Town yet there was one in Johannesburg. It is a no-brainer that comedy needed a home in Cape Town…I had to sell one or two classic cars and my partner also invested heavily in my business. It is at the V&A Waterfront [in Cape Town] so the rent is extremely high. It was worth it because at least 30 percent of our audience is not from Africa. We would have not been able to call on that market had we not been situated where we are.

How do you strike a balance between being an entrepreneur and a comedian?

This must be the thing I am struggling with the most. By just opening up the comedy club, people assumed you have taken up the other side. In the early stages, I found out that there are very huge demands on the business side of things. I work during the day and I perform at night.

Money or fame?

Most definitely, fame.

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