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Lights Camera Connie!

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Connie Ferguson’s success on the small screen has won her millions of fans. She is now looking for billions in the business world.

Eight summers ago, in a studio in the Northcliff neighborhood of Johannesburg, South African singer and actor Dineo Moeketsi was a bundle of nerves, auditioning for a role in the TV drama series, Rockville.

Judging the audition was actor, entrepreneur and the co-founder of Ferguson Films, Connie Ferguson.

The star, Moeketsi recalls, helped calm her nerves and erase the tension in the air.

“It’s rare to find a woman of her stature, it’s rare to find a woman of her grace, it’s rare to find a woman of her tenacity and prowess,” gushes Moeketsi.

She got the part and her only wish from then on was to spend more time with Ferguson learning her craft.

Moeketsi has since gone on to become one of Ferguson’s protégés and a popular actor herself. She now calls her mentor, ‘mom’.

Ferguson, a mother of two and proud grandmother, is one of South Africa’s most-loved TV personalities. Beyond the grease paint and the glaring lights of the TV studios, Ferguson is also a businesswoman.

On August 10, a day after Women’s Day – honoring the rocky resilience of the apartheid-era heroines of South Africa – we set up time to meet with Ferguson in a small studio in the leafy suburb of Greenside in Johannesburg.

The studio is on a road that is an airy strip of eateries, cafes, shisha parlors and salons.

READ MORE: The Two Faces That Mean Business

Ferguson arrives driving a cobalt blue BMW and looking relaxed, in unpretentious floral pants and a casual jacket, profusely apologizing for her lateness.

The first thing you establish as Ferguson walks in is she has no starry airs, warmly greeting everyone in the cold studio.

Nomsa Madida, the makeup artist who has worked with Ferguson for over a decade and regards the star as her ‘idol’, is already present with her elaborate beauty kit open in front of her.

It’s a daily ritual for Ferguson – getting made up to face the cameras.

She speaks animatedly about work, life and her three-year-old grandson Ronewa, who she calls Roro.

And then, as Madida works her brows, Ferguson fondly tells her: “Do you know what I like about your work? I look at myself and I don’t want to be photo-shopped.”

Connie Ferguson after getting her make-up done in a greenside studio. Photo by Gypseenia Lion.

The 48-year-old TV star smiles as she harks back to her beginnings in Botswana, and the move to Johannesburg to pursue her career, and stay the course.

She has come a long way.

Ferguson was born in Kimberley in the Northern Cape province of South Africa, as the third of seven children.

“Not having much when we grew up and just the pressure of wanting to do well so that you are able to empower the family; seeing your parents work so hard and you wish you could just grow up and work and relieve them of all that hard work; that was always something I wanted to do,” says Ferguson.

She moved to Botswana with her family when she was six years old, growing up there and then relocating again to South Africa in her late teens.

Everything she did subsequently, she continues to do today, be it modeling, acting, producing, and entrepreneurship.

Along the way, came success, recognition and fame.

“One of the questions I get asked a lot is ‘how have you managed to stay relevant for so long’? And I think the simple answer is this has always been my profession, my career, [it’s] not a get-rich-quick scheme or a get-famous-quick scheme. Fame is just a side-effect of what I do. It’s not something that defines who I am as a person or as a business person,” says Ferguson.

With 28 years in the television industry, she stole the hearts of South Africans as Karabo Moroka, one of the main protagonists in the soap opera Generations on SABC1. Even now, people call her Karabo.

“The name stuck but I think I have been very lucky because I have always been able to draw the line between myself as a real person and the characters I play on TV. It’s very important for me to remain real and live realistically in a realistic world because I think the pressure can be overwhelming because the characters that we play on TV…especially the characters that I’ve played…are all these powerful women I admire – very monied, very rich, it almost looks like things come too easy and that’s not what I want to teach my children, that things come too easy. I want them to know that they need to work for everything they have. They need to earn it.”

Generations first hit TV screens in 1994, the year South Africa became a democracy, going on to become the longest-running locally-produced soap on the national broadcaster.

It airs even now, as Generations: The Legacy, every week night.

Ferguson started as a model and actor doing advertisements and short projects. Once she got on to Generations, she was lucky to have a secure acting job because the television industry was unstable.

“It’s not easy for an actor in this country. I think it’s better now because there are a lot more opportunities than there were back then. But living from contract to contract is not as glamorous as it looks. But that said, if people use this opportunity well, it’s a great opportunity,” she says.

She was voted one of South Africa’s 10 Most Beautiful Women by Cosmopolitan magazine in 1993. Other recognition: the South African Foundation for Excellence and Achievement Award in 1988, the Duku Duku Awards, and the You Spectacular Award in 2017 for Favorite Actress.

For six years from 2008, she represented Garnier’s facial product Even & Matte, but in between, decided to launch her own brand of bodycare products.

“The bigger picture was then to eventually venture into everything, including facial products, and there was going to be a conflict of interest so I had to make that decision that ‘you know what, yes it’s a sacrifice, but I need to go it alone for now’,” she says.

What was the difference?

“Ownership is a big difference. It’s nice to be the face of a brand and you get a fee for representing the brand but at the end of the day, your name is, yes, it’s attached to the brand and yes, it’s great to be associated with it, but there’s no ownership, it’s not really yours,” she says.

Ferguson was ready to carve her own path in business.

She launched Koni Multinational Brands in 2013. It won the Upcoming Supplier Award in 2015 from the Shoprite supermarket group for her range of body lotions.

“The bigger picture and plan is to build a multibillion-rand business. Absolutely! I mean it has been done by multinationals and those products are doing very well in South Africa, so why can’t a South African brand do the same?”

With the launch of Connie Body Care, the actor donned a more serious role as entrepreneur. She released three body lotions at five Shoprite stores on a trial basis and passed the test. She personally developed each product with a chemist deciding on the scent and texture. She rolled it out in more Shoprite stores. As time went on, she also retailed at other stores including Clicks, Game and Choppies.

As a startup, there were challenges, but she is grateful Shoprite took her in when no one knew her brand.

“People knew Connie as a personality, as a TV brand, but not so much as a bodycare brand,” she says.

Ferguson wanted to get people to believe in local products, and her products for the quality and not just because it had her name.

“So trying to break that mould and make people believe was hard because I didn’t just want to ride on my name because you may buy the product initially because it’s Connie’s product but if the product is not good, you are not going to go back and buy it again…For me, it was very important that the product was able to sell itself,” she says.

In 2015, her range consisting of three variants had seen a year-on-year growth of more than 460% in Shoprite Checkers alone.

Ferguson also launched a men’s range.

But in early 2018, news reports surfaced that bodycare giant NIVEA was suing Koni Multinational Brands over alleged intellectual property violations. As per the reports, the action for “passing-off” was filed by NIVEA’s owners Beiersdorf AG on the allegations that the men’s shower gel had packaging similar to one of their products.

When quizzed about it, Ferguson tells FORBES WOMAN AFRICA: “We have our legal team dealing with their legal team so it’s not something I can openly talk about. But I think I can just say that it’s not anything that I’m worried about.”

When the reports surfaced, fans quickly rose to her defence on social media.

Ferguson says she has a brand people love.

“It has spoken for itself because…you buy the product, you go back and you ask for the same product. So it is not a novelty thing anymore just because it’s Connie’s face on the product. Now you are buying it because you love the actual product. And that was what was important for us.”

She says she is at a point where the brand is “now growing steadily” and “starting to see returns”.

African media mogul?

For the photoshoot for this feature, Ferguson changes into a bold red satiny blouse and white pants. Her makeup is light and her hair slicked back. She poses effortlessly in front of the camera.

“Lights, Camera, Action!” has been Ferguson’s reality for over two decades, and she has been extensively featured in the media.

Many admire her professionalism and dedication to the craft.

Her brand manager Thato Matuka from Brand Arc SA, who has worked with many prominent South African celebrities, says of Ferguson: “We all see where Ferguson Films is going. I mean every time you flip a channel, it’s a Ferguson Films product… I just see her conquering Africa, in terms of media and television…I just see her as an African media mogul,” he says.

Ferguson admits it has taken a lot of hard work to get there.

In the early days, before she dove into business, she would take on multiple jobs, anything that came her way, from acting to presenting to emceeing events.

“There would be times when I slept for like three hours because I was working the whole time and that takes a toll on the body,” she says.

“You need to know when to say ‘ok, enough’, when to say ‘ok, it’s not even worth the money’, and when to decide what is more important for you and I think that’s when you are able to find a good balance.”

It meant saying no to some of the opportunities such as events and appearances.

She left Generations in 2010 to focus on her production company and beauty business. The news sent shockwaves through South Africa’s TV industry.

Fans were devastated.

After being with the show 16 years, Ferguson left not knowing what lay ahead.

She took over as the producer and director of a new show, the 13-part drama series, Rockville, under her own film company, Ferguson Films, which she established with her husband Shona Ferguson.

The pair also acted in Rockville, which aired on Mzansi Magic.

To finance Ferguson Films, the couple took out a bond, and then a second bond on that bond.

“We had a vision and we knew that because we didn’t want to run a spaza shop, we wanted to run a business. We had to put money in to be able to get something out. We wanted to be taken seriously as business people. So we took a second bond on our house. We set up offices in Northcliff…,” says Ferguson.

Shona left his full-time job to focus on the business while Ferguson went back to acting to be able to make enough money to support it. “Those are the kind of sacrifices that one has to make. At the same time, they have to be calculated. Because I mean we thought about it. I could have left work as well at the time. But then what? We have kids, we have a bond and we have just taken out a second one. So there are risks involved. But you know, I think if you have a solid plan in place, you know that there are risks worth taking,” says the seasoned star.

In 2014, Ferguson was back on the TV screens as Generations was re-launched as Generations: The Legacy.

Ferguson Films needed more finance to keep the business running.

With both husband and wife being first-time producers, securing funding from investors was not easy.

“But if you don’t have necessarily a business record, how do you say to someone you are a business person? How do say to someone ‘give me your money and let me make you a show and let me make you money’? How do you make them buy into what you are selling?” says Ferguson.

In 2016, fans of Generations: The Legacy saw the departure of the star once again, this time for good, to focus on her production company.

After experiencing the entrepreneurial life, Ferguson never looked back. The company currently produces a show called The Queen, which both Ferguson and Shona act in, as well as a drama show called The Throne.

They see a growth of 30% this year, says Ferguson.

Ferguson Films has received the BET A-List Game Changers 2016 Award and the Naspers Order of Tafelberg Award in 2017.

The Queen has garnered many viewers who actively voice their opinions on social media.

Behind-the-scenes videos of the show reveal a hard-working team under Ferguson’s leadership.

They endearingly call her ‘Sis Coni’ or ‘Mama Connie’.

“My team is very naughty, jolly and playful. We work hard but we also play hard from time to time…,” says Ferguson.

She says she leads with honesty and openness.

“But when you speak from the heart, they can sense it as well and then they can take responsibility for whatever it is.”

Ferguson’s leadership style?

“I’m the kind of leader that is very happy to play when it’s play time but when it’s time to work, it’s down to the grind, we work,” she says.

“I never ever want to be a leader that’s feared because I feel then that your people don’t give you their best because they are scared of you so they are always like tip-toeing around you. I don’t want to be that person. I’m very approachable, I’m very warm but when I need to put my foot down, I can do that as well.”

TV production in South Africa is male-dominated and Ferguson was among the few women who opened up the industry to more women.

Ever since the push for 90% local content on TV screens, the industry has grown significantly.

Ferguson remains one of the most experienced and one of the few women to have played the most number of leading roles on South African television.

From auditioning for the formidable female lead in Generations, to now offering a chance to aspiring young actors in her own productions, she is building the next generation of actors, role models and possibly, entrepreneurs.

‘Mom’s A Team Player’

Lesedi Matsunyane-Ferguson

Connie Ferguson’s elder daughter, Lesedi Matsunyane-Ferguson, is a casting coordinator and production manager at Ferguson Films.

Literally growing up on her mother’s sets, she has seen her professionalism up close.

The 25-year-old Lesedi, who has studied drama and acting, says her mother has a quirky sense of humor and calls her a “simple, low-key person” with “a rare and incredible work ethic”.

“She’s the type of person that even if she was not feeling well she would come to work and give her all and you would not even know that she is sick until we wrap up or say ‘cut’. She is always a team player and she always lifts everyone else’s spirits on the set.” What qualities does she look up to in her?

“The amount of time and investment she has put into not only her craft but her businesses and it is helping everything flourish. And always being involved with everything she has ever done like with the perfume, with the glasses, with the lotions, she is there testing out all the products making sure that they smell good, making sure that they work for different types of skin tones. She is extremely passionate about anything she touches.”

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Forbes Africa | 8 Years And Growing

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As FORBES AFRICA celebrates eight years of showcasing African entrepreneurship, we look back on our stellar collection of cover stars, ranging from billionaires to space explorers to industrialists, self-made multi-millionaire businessmen and social entrepreneurs working for Africa. They tell us what they are doing now, how their businesses have grown, and where the continent is headed. 

Since its inception in 2011, and despite the changing trends in the publishing industry, FORBES AFRICA has managed to stay relevant, insightful and sought-after, unpacking compelling stories of innovation and entrepreneurship on the youngest continent, in which 60% of the population is aged under 25 years.

 Many of those innovations have been solutions-driven as young entrepreneurs across the continent seek to answer questions that have burdened their communities.

 Always on the pulse, FORBES AFRICA has chronicled and celebrated those innovations – prompting the rest of the globe to pay attention and be fully engaged.

 A prime example of this is the annual 30 Under 30 list, which showcases entrepreneurs and trailblazers under the age of 30 from business, technology, creatives and sports. In 2019, we had 120 entrepreneurs on the list, finalized after a rigorous vetting and due diligence process to well laid down criteria.

 We have always maintained the highest standards of integrity in all our reporting.

 As we transition into the next milestone, FORBES AFRICA reflects on the words of civil rights activist Benjamin Elijah Mays, who once said: “The tragedy of life is not found in failure but complacency. Not in you doing too much, but doing too little. Not in you living above your means, but below your capacity. It’s not failure but aiming too low, that is life’s greatest tragedy.”

 With the transformation in the media landscape, the recent awards given to the magazine for the work done by a hard-working, determined and youthful team, serve as a reminder that we are doing something right.

 Early this year, FORBES AFRICA journalist Karen Mwendera received a Sanlam award for financial journalism as the first runner-up in the ‘African Growth Story’ category. In January, FORBES AFRICA’s Managing Editor, Renuka Methil, received the ‘World Woman Super Achiever Award’ from the Global HRD Congress.

 In reflecting on the last eight years, this edition revisits a few of the strong, resilient men and women who have graced our covers.

For some, fortunes have literally changed, as witnessed in the fall of gargantuan African empires such as Steinhoff. Of course, there have been massive moments of triumph too, which have seen some new names feature on the annual African Billionaires List. There have also been moments of tragedy with former cover stars passing away.

 Africa is ripe for the taking and is seen as the next economic frontier. The unique position the continent finds itself in will no doubt give FORBES AFRICA plenty to report on. Here’s to more deadlines and debates for the next eight years.

– Unathi Shologu

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Mastercard: Diligent About Digital In Africa

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Mastercard knows only too well that technology can drive inclusive financial growth with simpler and more efficient ways to do business and life. And Raghu Malhotra, the man spearheading this trajectory in Africa, is also focused on social progress.


In many ways, Raghu Malhotra is like the brand he works for, leaving his footprints in different parts of the world, and in some cases, the most unlikely corners.

On a scorching summer’s day in June 2016, Malhotra traveled 100km east of Jordan’s capital city Amman, to a camp with white tents named Azraq built for the refugees of the Syrian Civil War.

In the desert terrain and hot, windy conditions, people had to queue for hours on end for plates of food handed out of visiting trucks. But some of them, displaced and homeless overnight, expressed their gratitude to Malhotra, President for Mastercard in the Middle East and Africa (MEA).

Mastercard, a technology company that engages in the global payments industry, had distributed e-cards, as part of a global collaboration with the World Food Programme, to the refugees that they could now use to purchase food and other supplies from local shops.

READ MORE | The Big Bank Theory: South Africa’s Banks Of The Future

 “I spoke to the people myself and saw what their lives were… Even those who were doctors with their families and were displaced… They said to me ‘you have restored dignity to our lives; you have no idea how demeaning it is to queue up to be given food’… We actually digitized how that subsidy for food was given. Some of these things go beyond economics,” says Malhotra. 

Beyond economics.

That very simply sums up Malhotra’s mandate for Africa as well.

The New York-headquartered Mastercard, ranked No. 43 on Forbes’ list of the World’s Most Valuable Brands, with a market cap of $247 billion, which connects consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and business, is fostering key partnerships across the African continent to help drive inclusive economic growth.

The idea, Malhotra says, “is to get our global skill-set to operate in its most efficient form in every local economy, at the same time, we must do good, and it must be sustainable.”

He calls Africa the next bastion of growth for various industries.

“As a company, we have stated we are going to get 500 million new consumers globally. And Africa plays a big part of that whole story… We want to be an integral part of various economies here,” says the man responsible for driving Mastercard’s global strategy across 69 markets.

Raghu Malhotra President for Mastercard in the Middle East and Africa. Picture: Motlabana Monnakgotla

“It probably took us over 20 years to get the first 50 million new consumers, in my part of the world, which is the Middle East and Africa (MEA). It took us probably five years to get the next 50 million, and last year alone, we put over 50 million consumers [in the formal economy] in MEA. That is part of our whole African story, so this is just not rhetoric; we are actually building our business on that basis.”

Home to four of the world’s top five fastest-growing economies, Africa has the fastest urbanization rate in the world, the youngest population, and a rapidly expanding middle class predicted to increase business and consumer spending.

It’s a continent of opportunity for global players like Mastercard with an eye on the potential of a booming consumer base and small and medium entrepreneurs, most of whom are still not a part of the formal economy. A large proportion of Africa is still unbanked. There is enough business opportunity in offering people digital tools so they can lead respectable financial lives.

READ MORE | The Monk Of Business: Ylias Akbaraly Talks About Secret To Success And Plans To Take Africa With Him

But it is in knowing that financial inclusion is not just about technology, but more about solving bigger problems, as the World Bank says in its overview for Africa: “Achieving higher inclusive growth and reaping the benefits of a demographic dividend will require going beyond a business as usual approach to development for Africa. Going forward, it is imperative that the region undertakes the following four actions, concurrently: invest more and better in its people; leapfrog into the 21st century digital and high-tech economy; harness private finance and know-how to fill the infrastructure gap; and build resilience to fragility and conflict and climate change.”

And in order to enable financial access, Mastercard has a balanced strategy in place, with the right partnerships for inclusive growth on the continent, Malhotra tells FORBES AFRICA.

“Every emerging market has different segments of people and you need to get the right product for the right segment. What we do is a balanced growth strategy across the continent based on timing, opportunity etc… Of course, because the bottom of the pyramid is much bigger, I think what we need is to adapt things differently; that is where the inclusive growth story comes from. That is where the opportunity is, but there is a second part to it…” And that, he summarizes, is advancing sustainable growth, doing good and bringing more transparency and efficiency.

The new pragmatic dispensation of governments in Africa towards ideas, technology and innovation has surely helped open up the stage to newer segment-driven products, especially as Africa already has such global laurels as Safaricom’s mobile money transfer and micro-financing service M-Pesa that took financial access to a whole new level. Also, sub-Saharan Africa remains one of the fastest-growing mobile markets in the world.

READ MORE | Feisty And Fearless Pioneers Thandi Ndlovu & Nonkululeko Gobodo

Malhotra says he finds African governments consistent in how they are rolling out their digital vision, and in trying to collaborate towards creating better ecosystems for their economies, though each is unique with its own dossier of problems.

“When I speak to various governments around Africa, I see a commonality of what their needs are and I also see a commonality in how they are trying to respond. So I think a lot of them realize running cash economies is a very inefficient way of doing things… Also, the consumer base is much more open to new technology because there is no bedded infrastructure or legacy infrastructure. I think where governments need to start thinking a bit more is how much do they want to do completely on their own.”

Part of this transformation on the path to financial progress is alleviating the burden of cash. Cash still accounts for most consumer payments in Africa. Mastercard, which started out as synonymous with credit cards, continues its efforts to convert consumers from cash to electronic transactions, and move beyond plastic.

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Pioneer For Women In Construction Thandi Ndlovu has died

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The cover of the August (Women’s Month) edition of Forbes Africa beautifully captures the essence of the woman I interviewed only a few weeks ago. Gracious, soft-spoken, brimming with life and energy. Dr Thandi Ndlovu impressed the entire Forbes crew on that afternoon cover shoot with her broad smile, and open yet powerful demeanor.

It is with great sadness that Forbes Africa heard of the accident that took her life on Saturday the 24 August 2019.

READ MORE |COVER: Feisty And Fearless Pioneers Thandi Ndlovu & Nonkululeko Gobodo

She had given so much to South Africa and its people – through the apartheid years and during the 25 years of democracy, literally building a better future, first through her medical practice at Orange Farm and then through her company, Motheo Construction Group and the scholarships for tertiary education granted by her Motheo Children’s Foundation.

That sunny winter’s afternoon, I asked her if she, at the age of 65, was considering retirement, and she laughed. A lively, amiable laugh. She told me she was healthy and strong and easily worked 12 to 13 hour days.

READ MORE | WATCH | Making Of The Women’s Month Cover: Thandi Ndlovu & Nonkululeko Gobodo

She loved hiking, and has climbed Kilimanjaro twice, reached the base camps of Mount Everest and Annapurna in Nepal. At the time of the interview, she was training to climb Machu Picchu, the famed ruins in Peru’s mountains.

One of her biggest passions was to make a difference in people’s lives and to motivate people to achieve the best they could. The other was to redress the racial tensions that still remained in South Africa.

Dr Thandi Ndlovu, South Africa is poorer for your passing.

-Jill De Villiers

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