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Public Private Partnerships Critical To Tackling The Financing Gap Of Developing Countries

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The current financing gap of developing countries is currently estimated at a staggering US$2.5 trillion each year. But Public Private Partnerships (PPP) could pose part of the solution, believes the Islamic Development Bank (IsDB).


The introduction of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals marked a new era for the international development community, raising the level of finance required from billions to that of trillions. Even the world’s strongest economies cannot resolve global development challenges alone.

To meet this financing gap, innovative sources of finance must be tapped along with new types of development projects – ones that operate at the nexus of financial viability and development impact. The right enabling environment also must be created to make markets work for development – they need to be dynamic, inclusive and sustainable.

“The biggest potential driver of short and long-term development is the private sector,” says President of the Islamic Development Bank, His Excellency Dr Bandar Hajjar, who is convening a coalition of internationally renowned experts, government officials and private investors today in Rabat, Morocco, for the 2nd annual PPP Forum: Shared Efforts for Shared Goals.

Experts will discuss how to improve the legal and institutional environment of public-private partnerships, particularly on the African continent where there is growing appetite from investors in PPPs.

Developing countries are facing huge budgetary constraints. Before the global financial crisis, between 2004-2008, the total budget balance of all the Islamic Development Bank’s member countries was in surplus of 3.8% of GDP on average. Between 2013-2017, however, this has turned into a deficit of 3.5% of GDP.

“The IsDB’s ambition is for a future in which governments establish and enforce rules and regulations that enable all economic agents in the market to play a role in development,” Dr Hajjar says.

There are several success stories of IsDB financing for PPP projects across Africa – one being the expansion and rehabilitation of the Jorf Lasfar Port project for OCP in Morocco, for which the IsDB has approved US$150 million.

The project was completed end of September 2017 and already total shipments from the port have almost doubled, jumping from 10 million tonnes to about 17.6 million tonnes, with the number of ships discharging from the port increasing from 571 to 686 vessels. A total of 200 jobs were also created by this project.

The IsDB and other lenders under a PPP financing structure also helped to dramatically expand the capability of the port of Djibouti. The country, strategically located on one of the fastest-growing east–west international shipping routes, at the entrance to the Red Sea, is ideally placed to expand its role as a shipping hub.

Now, thanks to a new container port developed with PPP funding, Djibouti can handle more than twice as much container traffic as before, is able to host the latest generation of giant container ships and is in a position to establish itself as a gateway to the Common Market for eastern and southern Africa.

This has strengthened Djibouti’s economy and fostered regional integration through the development of trade.

“PPP financing enables competitive advantage, higher quality and efficiency,” continues Dr Hajjar.

“Importantly, PPP financing reduces the burden on state budgets to complete investment-intensive development and infrastructure projects, optimizing the distribution of risks between the two sectors.

“This PPP Forum is therefore more important than ever, and we look forward to promoting the dialogue on PPP in order to drive meaningful change as we look to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.”

IsDB’s 2nd Annual PPP Forum: Shared Efforts for Shared Goals, is being held in Rabat on 28th February 2019 under the high patronage of His Highness King Mohammed VI of Morocco.

-Find out more at: https://ppp-forum.org/

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Healthy Nations Are Wealthy Nations

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 We live in a world where even a pover­ty-stricken Ghanaian child can dream of solving Africa’s health problems. I believe that everything begins with a vision for a better future and a passion for one’s continent and people, with perseverance, no obstacle cannot be overcome. Perseverance conquers all difficulties.

While an individual cannot provide a solu­tion to all of Africa’s unmet health needs, any effort goes a long way. I was a Ghanaian child that dreamt of an Africa in which all citizens would have access to adequate and affordable healthcare.

Africa is the second most populous continent, and home to 16%of the world’s population. The continent receives just a mere 1% of global expenditure on healthcare, a fact which is not only morally reprehensible, but economically unsustainable for families and their entire countries, as evidenced by the high medical costs, often inaccurate diagnoses, med­ication errors, and inadequate or unsafe clinical facilities for those who cannot afford better.

How does Africa, with a public healthcare system that is largely under-resourced and underfunded, build healthier nations? I have a few ideas:

1. Africa’s healthcare gap is worse in low and middle-income countries where 10-15% of hospitalized patients can expect to acquire an infection during their stay, as compared to 5-7% in high-income countries. This is despite hospital-acquired infections being easily avoided through better hygiene, improved infection control practices and appropriate use of antimicrobials. Because of statistics such as these, I am committed to doing my part to bring quality healthcare to people in developing nations through my non-profit, R.E.S.T.O.R.E Worldwide Inc.

Through the R.E.S.T.O.R.E foundation, which is primarily focussed on reconstruc­tive surgery, not only do I donate my surgical skills, but also my vast knowledge in regard to sustainable healthcare and capacity building within the industry.

Individual efforts to better a community ultimately culminate into a nation built by individuals and this is the Africa we want to see. This is not as difficult as we think to implement in practical ways, for example; if ones passion point is education, one can gather a few of the young people in the area and conduct lessons.

2. I am privileged, not only to be able to pro­vide but also have access to quality healthcare. However, I realize that this is not universal. As I write this, my thoughts are with the people of Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Malawi who are affected by Cyclone Idai.

What the survivors of this tragedy have in common is their immediate need for resources, stability, comfort, and medical help, among many other things. As well all know, healthcare does not exist in a vacuum. Efforts also have to go towards improving education, skills, and resources, as well as creating strategic partner­ships among key stakeholders.

Public-private partnerships exist in all forms to lend a hand to all kinds of causes. Neighborhoods and local governments could team up for a cleaning exercise, professional associations and governing bodies can also team up to help a cause of their own, either as a short or long-term endeavour.

An estimated 60% of healthcare financing in Africa comes from private sources which is a testament to the fact that public-private partnerships are a sustainable and feasible way to grow any sector.

3. Africa is confronted by a heavy burden of diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV – not to mention the disease of “inadequate surgical providers”. Studies show a gross lack of knowledge about the basics of how to diagnose and manage common diseases

Africa is definitely ready for relevant, reli­able healthcare dialogue. The top 30 innovators showcased at the recently concluded WHO Africa Health Forum in Cape Verde has given me and all other stakeholders immense hope. These 30 brilliant minds from across Africa and beyond have developed simple solutions to the complex and unmet health needs on the continent and these are the success stories that reinforce my belief in the future of a healthy Africa.

4. As healthcare stakeholders, it’s our re­sponsibility to develop new medicines to treat disease, but these medicines are useless if they can’t get to the patients who need them the most. We need to commit ourselves to work to­gether with all other healthcare players and to move away from simply donating aid, to build­ing sustainable infrastructure and capacity.

To answer my opening question on how a public healthcare system that is largely so under-resourced and underfunded can build healthier nations; I say this is one way that a little boy from Ghana or any part of the pover­ty-stricken parts of the developing world can solve health problems in his or her community and ultimately build healthier nations across the globe. This can be done through identifying their passion point, doing all they can in their power, seeking out other like-minded stake­holders to partner with and working to create better paths for the generations to come.

-For more information visit: restoreworldwide.org

-Dr Michael K Obeng; Founder and CEO of RESTORE Worldwide, Inc. & Global Health Solution

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HUGO BOSS Partners With Porsche To Bring Action-Packed Racing Experience Through Formula E

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Brought to you by Hugo Boss

HUGO BOSS and Porsche have partnered to bring an action-packed racing experience to the streets of the world’s major cities through Formula E.

Formula E is known for its fascinating races globally. The partnership will have a strong focus on the future of motorsport. In doing so the races will host a unique series for the development of electric vehicle technology, refining the design, functionality and sustainability of electric cars while creating an exciting global entertainment brand.

HUGO BOSS which boasts a long tradition of motorsports sponsorship – has been successfully engaged in the electric-powered racing series since the end of 2017.

In this collaboration, HUGO BOSS brings its 35 years of experience and expertise in the motorsport arena to Formula E, as well as the dynamic style the fashion brand is renowned for.


Alejandro Agag (Formula E CEO) and Mark Langer (HUGO BOSS CEO)

Mark Langer HUGO BOSS, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) says that though they have been working successfully with motorsports over the years, he is exceptionally pleased that as a fashion brand they are taking the cooperation to new heights.

“As a fashion brand, we are always looking at innovative approaches to design and sustainability. When we first encountered Formula E, we immediately saw its potential and we are pleased to be the first apparel partner to support this exciting new motorsport series,” he says.

The fashion group is also the official outfitter to the entire Porsche motorsports team worldwide.

The fascination with perfect design and innovation, along with the Porshe and Hugo Boss shared passion for racing, inspired Hugo Boss to produce the Porsche x Boss capsule collection.

Its standout features include premium leather and wool materials presented in the Porsche and HUGO BOSS colors of silver, black and red.


Porsche x BOSS: introducing a new collaboration | BOSS

Since March, a range of menswear styles from the debut capsule collection is available online and at selected BOSS stores. In South Africa the first pieces of the capsule will come as a part of the FW 19 collection.

Alejandro Agag, Founder and CEO of Formula E says he is confident that the racers will put their best foot forward on the racecourse.

“This new partnership will see the team on the ground at each race dressed with a winning mindset and ready to deliver a spectacular event in cities across the world. As the first Official Apparel Partner of the series, we look forward to seeing the dynamic style and innovation on show that BOSS is renowned for,” says Agag.


Hugo Boss x Porsche  

Oliver Blume CEO of Porsche AG says Formula E is an exceptionally attractive racing series for motorsport vehicles to develop.

“It offers us the perfect environment to strategically evolve our vehicles in terms of efficiency and sustainability. We’re looking forward to being on board in the 2019/2020 season. In this context, the renowned fashion group HUGO BOSS represents the perfect partner to outfit our team.”

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The Anzisha Summit – Towards A Future Driven By Africa’s Youngest Entrepreneurs

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April 15, 2019 will hopefully mark the day a new phrase enters popular discourse about how our economic futures could play out. The term “4th Industrial Revolution” has come to embody the conversation around the supply-side of the jobs debate -skills and education.

We hope to drive new research, discussion and policy around the demand-side of employment by deeply exploring entrepreneurship as a career – particularly for students of high potential.

What if skilled students with options chose an entrepreneurship path and hired their friends and peers along the way? What does Africa’s youth employment situation look like if this happens?

The Anzisha Scenario campaign concept was born after heated discussions and exchanges internally in response to a research paper that was released in 2018, and the resulting coverage it got in the media. The research took a position that older founders in the US have been more successful as entrepreneurs generally, and, particularly, when it comes to scale and job creation. The ensuing media and social media coverage seemed to quickly extrapolate this to an insight that applied globally. Emails quickly circulated across the entrepreneurship and education ecosystems, echoing the sentiments of the research and its impact for programming.

I had a particularly strong reaction to the report. It’s not that the research is wrong (it isn’t), it’s that it:

  • Is pretty obvious. Prior work, life and management experience should make you a better entrepreneur when you’re older, in the same way it should make you a more successful manager or leader within an existing business.
  • Inadvertently positions the problem of youth unemployment as largely unsolvable by young people themselves. But with not enough job opportunities to start with, if only people with 15+ years’ experience can create other jobs, we’re in a heap of trouble.
  • Is quickly supported by those who have followed traditional education and career pathways, crowding out other experience pathways as less legitimate. Anyone who got a great degree, and then worked for a great company, is immediately validated and pre-qualified as a better scale entrepreneur through formal training. Few have that opportunity.

Having had this research kick off some of our own thinking, we started to look at our own evidence and work. And this then became the next driver of investing in a campaign as a pan-African, inclusive, multi-stakeholder scenario planning exercise.

We have seen, time and again, young entrepreneurs start out from the very youngest of ages, and slowly build careers –in the same way any other career professional would. Those that are well supported throughout tend to be more successful, just as a well-supported professional would be on their path to senior management. We will be presenting these stories in a Hall of Fame campaign later in the year.

We also have seen clear evidence that managers hire from their peer group in terms of age. Older entrepreneurs hire older professionals. Young entrepreneurs hire young. The only people really willing to hire 19 year olds without question are 23 year old entrepreneurs (or thereabouts).

We have seen young people of high potential and with options – they are actively recruited by universities and employers – choose entrepreneurship.

The combination of this and many other thoughts is part of the discussion we want to have. Is the Anzisha Scenario possible? What are the drivers, barriers and opportunities? What are the roles of parents, teachers, students, policy-makers and other stakeholders in making the choice of “entrepreneurship as a career” desirable and supported, with appropriate income as you grow? The Anzisha Scenario as a conversation on campus has already begun to influence our own curriculum planning as our faculty think about their role in promoting and supporting entrepreneurship as a career path.

We’ve already had two stakeholder workshops with cross-sector representatives from South Africa, Mauritius, Egypt, Rwanda, Kenya, Zimbabwe and Botswana. (Thanks to ALA, ALU, ALX, Harambee, Allan Gray Orbis Foundation, Driven Entrepreneurs, E-squared, Imagine Scholar, McKinsey, Nova Pioneer, RLabs, and Startup Academy).

On April 15, during the inaugural Very Young Entrepreneur Education and Acceleration Summit, we’ll host our first experts’ panel and launch the draft position paper. Please follow or contribute to the conversation using the hashtag #AnzishaScenario. Make sure to also watch highlights from the Summit at anzisha.org/summit. Let’s see if we as a community can put young people at the center of solving the employment challenges we collectively face.

– Josh Adler

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