Connect with us

Big Shots

Poll Position: The South African 2019 Elections

mm

Published

on

May 8, a landmark day for Africa’s second biggest economy. South Africans will cast their votes for the country’s sixth general elections since the dawn of democracy in 1994.

In the run-up to the polls, the country saw flagrant protests in some parts, as disgruntled citizens expressed disapproval of their stifling living conditions. 

In this image, a resident of Alexandra, a township in the north of Johannesburg, squats in the middle of a busy road leading to the opulent precincts of Sandton, Africa’s richest square mile.  

The dichotomy of socio-economic circumstances is an accelerant in one of the country’s poorest communities filled to the brim with squatter camps and the restlessness of unemployment.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Comments

Big Shots

Cash, Credit And Community

mm

Published

on

The billion-rand spaza shop (township tuckshop) industry in South Africa is not a regulated sector. Most transactions at these shops are in cash, and not electronically tracked. This makes it difficult for spaza shops to be financially credited in South Africa.

But there are now fintech solutions such as Zande Africa offering financial and distribution platforms, operating out of warehouses, to assist these spaza shops in their townships, by delivering daily necessities to them.

READ MORE: IN PICTURES | The Occupation Of Unemployment In South Africa

 In this image, Tedy Tizedo, the owner of Thandabantu, a tuckshop in Ermelo in the Mpumalanga province of South Africa, pays a local Zande Africa agent for delivering bread from its distribution warehouse.

 The fintech company provides cash and credit service offerings to all spaza shop owners and creates relationships with them for better pricing and service. 

Continue Reading

Big Shots

Gathering Around The Kraal

mm

Published

on

Men gather around a kraal in Mcwangele, a village in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. Most traditional families in rural South Africa own kraals, or enclosures designated for livestock.

During ceremonies, women are traditionally not allowed inside the kraal, unless they are more mature and elderly, and on the rare occasion, selected to speak.

In this picture, a cow is confined to a kraal to observe rituals ahead of the unveiling of a tombstone (a culture practiced mostly by black South Africans). A cow is used, rather than sheep, on this occasion.

Decades ago, my great grandparents were buried in this village of their birth about 840kms from Johannesburg.

Three generations later, I am here with my family to support our grandparents who felt the need to mark their parents’ graves that had been in a dilapidated condition. 

Remembering her father, my  grandmother Dade Patricia Monnakgotla, said: “Our father, Dabula Petros Nhose, would travel regularly to Gauteng by bicycle or horse from here and it would take him about 10 days.”

The anecdotes from the older generation about a bygone era were indeed engrossing. Nhose died in 1977, while his wife, my great grandmother, Monica Chule Nhose, died in 1971.

The legacy of the Nhose clan name lives on, tattooed on my arm.

Continue Reading

Big Shots

The African Spin

mm

Published

on

September is celebrated as ‘heritage month’ in South Africa honoring history, tradition and culture through food, music, art and fashion.

Here, we deep-dive into the colorful world of African fabric and print, showcasing Aurelie Tshimbombo, born in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and now based in Johannesburg as one of the city’s many entrepreneurs promoting African print.

“I fell in love with fabric, I fell in love with how clothes make a woman feel,” says Tshimbombo.

READ MORE: The Designer Who Dreams of Sweeping Floors

“Women feel empowered, they feel prettier, they feel braver, and they feel more unique if they wearing something that brings out the confidence in them. I found that whole process intriguing.”

Almost a decade ago, Tshimbombo’s epiphany was when she started making clothes for herself but couldn’t find anything in the market that reflected who she was.

“I am a short, curvy African woman,” she says.

Her label’s name is Afrinique Chic, which she says is a luxury lifestyle fashion brand for Africans and the rest of the world.

Continue Reading

Trending