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The New Wave Of Disruptors

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Africa’s first fully tech-savvy generation, known as Generation Z, is coming of age, bringing to business more innovation and disruption than the millennials (also known as Generation Y, born from the 1980s) before them.

They are the “i-everything generation”, because they are hyper-connected, always plugged-in to devices and daring dreams. These professionals, now entering the workforce, have never known a world without smartphones or social media. As national development plans and Sustainable Development Goals set 2030 as their target for change, the first generation of real ‘digital natives’ that could make that possible, are here.

In South Africa, Generation Z is also the ‘Born Free’ generation, born after the end of apartheid.

These are today’s young adults, born around 1995, who have seen the impact on their parents of the ravages of the global recession and the threats of terrorism.

“It’s extremely difficult, if not impossible, to be born between 1996 and 2000 and have a strong, emotional connection to 9/11. Your brain is simply too young to put the event in a cultural, geographic, or other context. From our research-based vantage point, if you were born in the US and 9/11 has always been history to you — something you literally cannot remember — then you are not a millennial but a member of Generation Z.”

These are the well-articulated words of Jason Dorsey, president, co-founder and a millennials and Gen Z researcher at The Center for Generational Kinetics, on the phone with us from Austin, Texas, in the United States (US).

His research has led him to become a specialist in studying millennials and Gen Zers. He has also delivered many TED Talks on the topic.

According to Dorsey’s research, members of Generation Z need to be connected instantly and constantly, to experience stability, and to make an impact on the world. So much so that they have more in common with their friends on social media,who they’ve never met in person before, than with their own grandparents.

“What we find is that an inexpensive mobile device really does begin to connect people to the world and that internet access changes not just how young people see the world, but how they see themselves in relation to the world. That’s what’s so powerful,” says Dorsey.

“It’s pretty shocking when I go to work in some place like India and to see the similarity [to the United States]. The language may be different, but the interaction and the expectation are very similar. The key to this is they’ve got to be younger but old enough to use some sort of mobile device, or have some sort of a mobile experience.”

Not only are Gen Z well-connected, but they show signs of being a generation focused on spending money on experiences; are less accepting of information presented to them; they strive for realistic stability in the job world; are more advanced in searching for information; are curious to experiment on their own.; and demand a personal touch when it comes to buying or selling products.

“[It is a misconception] that Gen Z are big spenders. But the truth is, Gen Z are increasingly savers that are dealing with the aftershocks of the great recession. Many Gen Zers, and this is the quote that they give during our interviews with them, say ‘I don’t want to end up like the millennials’,” says Dorsey.

Generation 2030: (From left) Lethabo Motsoaledi, Tayla Barter and Kiara Nirghin (Photo by Jay Caboz)

Linda Ronnie, a Senior Lecturer in Organisational Behaviour and People Management, Graduate School of Business, University of Cape Town, in South Africa, says Gen Z are going to be a dominant force in the world to come. With almost five generations of humans now working alongside each other, Gen Z will take up an estimated two billion worldwide. In South Africa, a third of the population is under 21.

Gen Z are authorities on tech trends. They have never known a world where a question wasn’t able to be answered by Google. So what looks like disruption to older generations is a Gen Z norm. Fundamentally this means that they have a completely different view of technology from other generations.

“What we’ve found recently, is that we looked at how millennials and Gen Z go about ordering food for delivery or To-Go, which is a very big trend that we think is going to reshape the restaurant industry. What we’ve found is that millennials will use their mobile app, or restaurant digital website, to go and place an order. They went there because they knew what they order and it was a fast efficient way to order it. When we talked to Gen Z, we found that Gen Z wanted to see what the restaurant offered.

“So one went to order, the other wanted to search around and see what they had. Again not a huge difference in age, but a very different expectation of the digital experience and what drives them to use that channel,” says Ronnie.

Then there is the fourth industrial revolution. As Gen Z is coming of age, it will mean many will have jobs that have not even been created yet and they will be fighting for jobs with non-humans. We are entering the era where machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) will impact the workforce.

This does not mean parents should panic and teach their kids to program instead of Mandarin, but it wouldn’t be a bad idea.

“There are three things we focus on in Gen Z in particular. First is, we want to make sure we teach kids problem-solving and critical thinking skills, because that helps them everywhere and anywhere. It’s a core thing that we want to make sure we are doing. The second thing we want to teach them is to work technology very well, because technology is the grand connector and opportunity creator. Then the third thing is the idea of creative and open-mindedness. Because we are going to go through a time of transformational change, rapid incredible change, we want the next generation to not be fearful of that change but embrace it, embrace that newness and the unexpected because that’s what’s going to give them an advantage going forward,” says Dorsey.

READ MORE: Should we be worried about Generation Z joining the workforce? Here’s why not

For the Gen Zer, topics like equality and diversity will become even more important in the workplace. Major life events, like marriage and parenthood, are being pushed back around the world, even though it looks different in various countries. There is also a different attitude toward entrepreneurship with this generation.

“If you ask people ‘are the millennials the most entrepreneurial generation’, people will guess of course they are always starting their own business. In some case this is true, millennials are very much interested in entrepreneurship, they place it top among career paths and their heroes are increasingly entrepreneurs rather than celebrities and sports stars,” says Dorsey.

“But because of the recessionary aftershocks, Gen Z really does seek out stability right now. They want predictability. They want to know when they are going to work and how much they are going to be paid when. At this stage they seem more risk-averse.

“It is a very pragmatic approach to work and making money. So we think Gen Z will continue to be entrepreneurial but they are really serious about building stability. Being an entrepreneur is not the fastest way for that. What we believe is going to happen is Gen Z will build a business on the side but still keep a predictable income rather than what millennials did and went all in on businesses and it didn’t work and they had the safety net of their parents.”

So what does this mean for African business and emerging markets?

“They are going to be the drivers of consumer growth, they are the drivers of trends and they are increasingly the drivers of the workforce.”

In many cases this will mean developing countries, like many in Africa, will leapfrog and skip generations of infrastructure and move straight to the next big thing, vis-à-vis becoming forerunners of disruption themselves.. Look at the impact of mobile telephony in Africa for example.

“You don’t bring the mindset of a laptop or a desktop or dial up or a landline. You’ve both never had that experience nor been limited by it. So you come in a whole different level without being anchored to something in the past, which we believe is very powerful and can springboard you forward,” says Dorsey.

As the world waits with bated breath, hoping this smartphone-wielding generation will bring fresh ideas and profits, Africa must embrace them too. The disruptors, here they come.

Kiara Nirghin (Photo by Jay Caboz)

Pectin, Polysaccharides And Orange Peels To Combat Drought

Kiara Nirghin, 17

Johannesburg, South Africa

It’s the forward-thinking game-changing idea scientists spend their lives developing and a teenager from Africa beat them to it.

The source of inspiration – powder, found commonly in babies’ nappies that can soak up and retain large amounts of water like a sponge, and that’s now being used to combat drought.

“It’s a low-cost, biodegradable, super-absorbent polymer made out of orange peels and avocado peels.”

It’s not the conventional way to start a conversation with a teenager. While many adults would be left scratching their heads wondering what this means, Kiara Nirghin, the 17-year old science buff, explains.

“The idea came about was when I was looking through newspapers; any media I came across and everything was about the drought in South Africa and what 67% of the world faces. I realized this is a worldwide epidemic and there isn’t really a solution to the drought, or assisting crop survival, and helping poor communities, which it mostly affects, to combat this problem.”

From her home in Johannesburg, Nirghin, who grew up sharing notes on National Geographic and science magazines with her sister, the solution was simple science.

“I thought if you put [the polymer] into the soil of a plant it can absorb large amounts of water and also act a reservoir. [Super Absorbent Polymers] SAPs are already being used in agriculture. But I realized they were very expensive and not low-cost and, were chemical-based and not biodegradable. Being expensive, it didn’t solve the problem because most of the time, drought is affecting poorer countries,” says Nirghin.

Nirghin’s invention, titled ‘No More Thirsty Crops’, was so cool she was awarded the grand prize as well as the Africa/Middle East regional Google Science Fair Community Impact Award at the Google Science Fair at Google’s headquarters in California. Apart from giving her instant international credibility, it also gave Nirghin a chance to take a selfie with one of her heroes, Sundar Pichai, the CEO of Google.

“I knew if I didn’t take a selfie with him I would be really upset,” says Nirghin.

To her, the science behind the invention was more cool than the prize. She entered on a whim, having researched months before she even knew about the competition.

“[My research found oranges] have over 60% pectin and also polysaccharide, which if you cross link it in a polarization process become the qualities of a super absorbent polymer. I was very surprised nobody else hadn’t thought about it this way. So I took a lot of orange peels and started to heat them and see what cross linking would come up.”

Once she broke the science down, it was time to begin testing. Nirghin looked at water absorption in a basil plant for three-six months. Like any budding scientist would do, she used controls and other SAPs to compare her mixture. It meant spending months measuring the soil moisture daily, every three hours, for accuracy.

“The thing that surprised me was I didn’t add any water to these crops, this was for a period of 60 days and these crops were still alive. That was the main thing, keep these crops alive without constant water supplements.”

It was all worth it as the data she meticulously recorded brought exciting results.

In November, Nirghin signed a contract with an agriculture company to begin research and development of her invention on a mass level. The research could take two years; by 2020, it might be ready to roll out and start helping people.

Apart from orange peels, which Nirghin admits she’s getting tired of seeing, she is also done a TED Talk.

“When I was 13 I had bacterial meningitis, that’s inflammation of the membrane along the spinal cord. When I was in hospital, I realized if this is the strength of the brain to endure such immense pain, how can the brain’s strength be used for something else. That’s really what got me interested in science.”

She is also a strong advocate for women in science.

“Why shouldn’t girls be doing science? It shouldn’t be something we are talking about because everybody should be doing science and the fact that we aren’t emphasizing that is discouraging girls,” says Nirghin.

Among her many other interests, Nirghin enjoys watching Masterchef Australia, cooking and coming up with ways to prevent rhino poaching – her other pet passion besides orange peels.

“It’s a misconception that just because you are young doesn’t mean you can’t stop something, you don’t have to wait till you are older.”

Having finished matric with eight distinctions and ranking in the top 5% of IEB candidates for six or more subjects, Nirghin has a slew of universities that have offered her a spot including Harvard, MIT and Stanford in the US.

“My top priority is education in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) and understanding these fields I am innovating in… That’s the amazing thing about South Africa, it’s untapped. Everything is very saturated in Silicon Valley. To come back with knowledge would present so many opportunities in South Africa.”

A strong message from the Gen Zer inspiring Africans to peel off their layers and experiment; age is no bar.

Tayla Barter (Photo by Jay Caboz)

Paid To Play Heroes

Tayla Barter, 24

Johannesburg, South Africa

It has to be one of the strangest hobbies to come out of the internet – Cosplay or dressing up as your favorite comic book character.

For Barter, who goes by the name Kinpatsu, it’s not only a way of life but a way of earning a living. This is because Barter is part of a generation of entrepreneurs using the internet to turn their hobbies into a profession making them R50,000 ($4,300) a month.

“It comes from the word costume play and that’s the core of what cosplay is,” offers Barter.

It was a photo posted on the internet in 2013 that changed everything for Barter. A selfie of herself dressed up as character Jinx from the popular game League of Legends went viral. It was the first time people started taking notice.

READ MORE: ‘Cos We Play

Back then, Cosplay was just beginning to take off in South Africa. Barter was one of a handful of Cosplayers climbing out of cars and assembling their outfits in a parking lot before entering conventions. It was a fun thing for her to do on the weekends.

“We didn’t even think we would be leaving the country for Cosplay, getting international Cosplayers in over here so it wasn’t something we thought would be a business model in any kind of sense,” says Barter.

Fast forward to 2018 and a quick Google search later, and you will find Barter in hundreds of other cosplays. She now has 177,000 followers and counting on Facebook, 23,000on Twitter, 223,000 on Instagram. It has meant she’s now able to travel as a guest celebrity to geek conventions and compete in international cosplay competitions.

From her home in the leafy suburb of Northriding in Johannesburg, Barter has a whole business dedicated to the profession. In 2017, she finished 36 cosplays with an armory of drills; shelves of foam armor and a photo studio in her garage.

Key to her success has been selling her cosplay designs on crowdfunded Patreon, the hobbyist version of Kickstarter. Supporters pledge money and based on the money you put in and the tier, you are given a reward.

Barter found a demand to show how you could turn the characters from screen grabs into cosplays and teach others to do it. Cosplayers spend thousands building each outfit from EVA foam and PVC piping. Even more reason for hobbyists who need direction on tight budgets.

“I thought I’d give it a whole year and see where it’s taking me. By the end of 2017, I was almost completely booked for 2018. Conventions and Patreon picked up and now I can do it full-time,” says Barter.

As businesses migrate toward more online profiles, channels like Facebook have become smarter about making their own money from them. One way is to shape posts, or limit posts to your audience unless you pay to have the reach extended.

In Barter’s case, with thousands of followers, she is only getting 1,000 to 2,000 likes on each post, whereas a few years ago she could hit numbers in the tens of thousands. Another issue is what they call being ‘soft-blocked’. This is when a channel, like Youtube or Instagram, uses algorithms and machine-based filters to identify keywords and block your account.

Shaping and being soft-blocked can severely hurt a social media-based business, especially when those businesses make money from the hits on the internet.

Barter is a hero in her own right among the South Africans who dress as superheroes.

Lethabo Motsoaledi and Matthew Westaway (Photo by Jay Caboz)

They Both Want To Be The Next Elon Musk

Lethabo Motsoaledi, 24 & Matthew Westaway, 26

Cape Town, South Africa

It was an unlikely partnership that brought two engineering students, who grew up worlds apart, together. Lethabo Motsoaledi grew up idolizing scientists wanting to be one, even though she was afraid of breaking computers. Matthew Westaway grew up in Rondebosch, programming computers and doing little else.

“My whole family was doctors, I wanted to figure out what can I not do that’s the same. It was something that needed maths and science, and then I chose engineering. I didn’t choose it because I wanted to program, I hated computers. On reflection it’s because I didn’t want to break them and have to fix them again,” says Motsoaledi.

“I was an internet person. I would always know how to fix any problem on a computer, going deep into the registry. That’s what I would spend a lot of time doing, finding viruses and where the files are. From a young age I was able to fix computers and know what you could do from the internet, solving challenges,” says Westaway.

They saw opportunity where other entrepreneurs see the internet and disruption technologies like 3D printing and machine learning as treacherous rocks rising from stormy waters. They also both want to be the next Elon Musk.

It led them to open their business, Motsoaledi & West (M&W), a Design Thinking consultancy that launched in January 2017. In just one year, they made R1 million ($86,000).

Now, the two graduates work through the night until 4AM to build their ideas. From their offices at the innovation hub, Rise, in Woodstock in Cape Town, they are infamously known as the post-it kids, leaving reams of the sticky squared blocks of paper in their wake as they bounce their ideas off the glass walls.

“Innovation comes exactly in a pack of post-its,” says Motsoaledi.

In their words, they help companies fast-track innovation through applying accelerated design thinking methodology. In an environment that’s so volatile a 17-year-old teen can make your business irrelevant, organizations need to equip themselves.

This is because those companies that are best able to adapt and embrace uncertainty and find creative solutions are growing faster and have higher profit margins than their competitors.

“People tend to think you buy the new technology and then you become innovative, but that’s not the case. The mistake is thinking that you just need to apply a whole lot of technology and algorithms in order to fix the problem. The first thing is solving the problem – what do the people need? Then you can start with using technology to improve the challenge,” says Motsoaledi.

Design thinking is the latest strategy for driving innovation in business.  What they do is get companies to understand their customers’ actual needs and desires rather than focus on bottom-line profits. The duo believe that in order for businesses to thrive they need to transition toward customer-centricity.

This is where their self-designed machine learning can help. Using algorithms, the duo can analyze and automate transcribed text and pick up on the keywords from interviewees.  It brings the data to life and can aggregate insights in minutes, saving companies thousands of hours.

“When you are using this kind of software and programs, sometimes you don’t know what it is you are looking for, or you didn’t know if it would have meant anything. You have to analyze it and let the data tell you what it is it is finding,” says Motsoaledi.

They can tell you firsthand how powerful this data can be. Using their own design thinking the duo established their 3D printing business in 2014, from which successful projects emerged; Printing a 3D ultrasound scan called Hello Baby 3D Prints; and The Hourglass Project, an interactive design piece that helps corporates encourage and track participation in Employee Volunteerism Programs.

“You pick up on a new technology and you figure out what it is that you can do to leverage it. When we were running 3D power we picked up a much more pertinent need that we needed to focus on the – design thinking,” says Motsoaledi.

And should we be teaching our kids to program?

“Girls have a lot of unlearning to do…Where I grew up, girls didn’t program. The way we think about maths and science, we should start thinking about programming…Thinking about all these innovators and inventors, as a kid, I always loved them. Back then, scientists were the celebrities. What I don’t like about society today is that a celebrity is not considered a thought leader or a celebrity is someone who only does acting. I like that Elon Musk changed that. I hope that in South Africa, people become ingrained in the culture of making entrepreneurs our heroes,” says Motsoaledi.

Maud Chifamba, 19, Zimbabwe

At the age of 14, Maud Chifamba, unable to afford high school and having taught herself at home, became the youngest student to enrol at the University of Zimbabwe. Four years later, she became the University’s youngest graduate walking away with an honors degree in accountancy.

There were signs of her proficiency from early on. Chifamba was pushed up a grade when she accidentally was given a Grade 4 exam and scored 100%. That same year, she requested a Grade 5 test paper and was pushed up even further.

When she was seven years old, her father passed away and she fell under the care of her step-brother living on a plot in between Kwekwe and Gweru, Zimbabwe. Having been unable to afford high school, Chifamba home-schooled herself, where her work and innovation earned her a scholarship of $9,993 to go to university. Online searches show her as “Africa’s youngest university student”.

Currently, she is completing both a Zimbabwe Certificate in Theory of Accounting at Chartered Accountants Academy, and a Masters in Accountancy at the University of Zimbabwe.

Abelwe Ndiki, 17, South Africa

At 16, schoolgirl Abelwe Ndiki, noticed many of her peers were overwhelmed with their future career choices. She saw that many young people, especially those that grew up in underprivileged communities, were unaware of the entry requirements for universities. So Ndiki built the Guide Me app to help them find their way.

“I noticed that there was no application that was currently catering to the students’ needs. My app is different from other programs that try to tackle this problem because as a student I am able to efficiently communicate information in a language high school students understand,” says Ndiki.

“My inspiration moment came earlier in 2017 when I noticed a trend of senior students not having a clear idea of what they are going to do in universities or how wide the options are for those seeking financial assistance.”

Along with courses, the app lists bursaries and their requirements. A move which Ndiki hopes will improve the quality of life for students by opening them up to financial assistance options.

“It is also beneficial to students who cannot afford to regularly commute to town to access internet cafés, the fact that they can access the information from their phones was my main focus,” she says.

In matric this year, Ndiki took the app down off the GooglePlay Store while she focuses on her own education. She is on the lookout for a mentor who can help guide her career and business.

Rebecca Andrianarisandy, 21, Madagascar

With just $15, this team of four young women from Madagascar started GasGasy, a bio-compost and bio-gas company. They wanted to tackle the rising issue of deforestation in the region of Itasy in central Madagascar, devastated by charcoal makers cutting down tapia forests.

“What is sad about it is that eight trees have to be cut out in order to have one bag of charcoal,” says Rebecca Andrianarisandy, one of GasGasy’s founders.

Taught by foreign volunteers who specialized in biotechnology, the friends thought this would be a sustainable and environmentally friendly solution for people instead.

“Now, I am 21 and the business has been running for two years now. Up to now, we have sold 27,000 liters of bio-compost considering that one liter equals $0.5.”

The bio-compost becomes a fertilizer combined with an insecticide. Andrianarisandy claims compost not only stops farmers using chemical fertilizers but also stops the soil from becoming infertile for years after, compared with chemical fertilizers.

“FamBIOlena is already proven to have improved 38 farmers’ lives by increasing their harvest from 10% to 65%. As a result, the product will create food security for the farmers and their community as well. ”

While the bio-compost is already being sold to agripreneurs, the team isn’t going to stop there. By 2019, they plan to sell bio-gas as well, having tested their cooking fuel in three households.

A true green innovation first for Madagascar from a young team of teenagers who believe they can change a nation’s ecological destiny.

 

Sharon ShazZ Waison (Photo by Jay Caboz)

Sharon Waison, 25, South Africa

Imagine a job that pays you to play computer games. Well Sharon Wiason, is doing just that. Fresh off a plane from a tournament where she competed alongside South African all-girl team Leetpro in China, Waison is part of a growing industry that plays computer games as a profession, known as esports.

“I started playing competitively at around the age of 14-15, I am now 26, so yeah, you do the maths,” she says with a smile.

“I think esports helps innovate my community as it provides job opportunities. I have made a fair amount of money, not enough to live off but a decent amount. I remember in matric it’s how I had money to go out with my friends… just won little tournaments here and there was great.”

These days, ShazZ, as she is more commonly known, has been kicking ass even against men. She is part of the Pulse-Gaming’s Counter-Strike: Global Offensive (CS:GO) team and is a brand ambassador of ASUS South Africa.

“It was very hard in the beginning for me, because you are a girl in a very male-dominated industry. I had to prove myself for a few years. I got a lucky break where someone took a risk and it kind of paid off,” says ShazZ.

READ MORE: Female Gamers – The New Sport Stars

At the age of 10, ShazZ was diagnosed with the autoimmune disease lupus. She was unable to play sport outside, so she took up computer games instead.

“Games make me forget about everything. You go into another world, you focus on that game and you become the character in that sense,” says ShazZ.

Edgar Edmund, 17, Tanzania

After seeing floods sweep away mud houses in his country Tanzania, Edgar Edmund, then 15, wanted to make a change. He not only wanted to provide an alternative solution to the problem of expensive cement materials, which many people could not afford, but also solve the matter of pollution that was causing a wide range of diseases due to poor waste management.

“Tanzania is a developing country, hence most of the people here are low income earners, hence there is a high demand for affordable products which could at least enable many people to own their own houses regardless of their low incomes,” says Edmund.

The answer hit like a ton of bricks: make building blocks from the very waste causing the problem.

In 2015, during school holidays, he experimented by melting plastic waste in a homemade gas cooker. By mixing the molten plastic with sand he was able to mould durable long-lasting bricks, paving blocks and roof tiles. Edmund also came up with a way of filtering out the toxic chemicals, produced in the process, by engineering a dioxin filter using cooking oil.

The business is still young like Edmund, but he has high hopes for the future. By 2017, GreenVenture Recycles is a full operation with five employees. With more than 15,000 bricks made from more than 1.2 million plastic bags that would have otherwise gone into the environment, Edmund celebrated a turnover of $1,500 in December. The company is putting its profits toward expanding. He says his business has created 100 indirect jobs.

“Plastics are regarded as unwanted materials, that means we get them at a low price and that makes our products affordable but also on the other hand plastics binding sand makes a strong mix and this gives it a long life since plastic takes a long time to decompose,” says Edmund.

In 2017, Edmund was awarded the winner of the Children’s Climate Prize, sponsored by Swedish renewable energy company Telge Energi.

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30 under 30

Forbes Africa #30Under30 list: Business, Technology, Creatives and Sport

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THE FORBES AFRICA 30 UNDER 30 LIST IS THE most-anticipated list of game-changers on the continent and this year, we bring you 120 of Africa’s brightest achievers under the age of 30 and for the first time, four categories featuring 30 in each: Business, Technology, Creatives and Sport.

From elevator manufacturing, solar energy design, to under-30s conquering the Alps and selling out the Apollo Theatre,  this year’s list demonstrates how enterprising and extraordinary the African youth is.

This list celebrates these pioneers who are building brands, creating jobs, and innovating, leading, transforming and contributing to new industries, in turn, changing the continent. 

“The future belongs to Africa and the future belongs to its youth,” says Jason Pau, Chief of Staff for International to billionaire Jack Ma, co-founder of Alibaba. He says the journey for young entrepreneurs, especially in Africa, is not always easy. Many startups fall by the wayside due to a lack of resources. In South Africa, it is estimated that the small enterprise failure rate is at almost 80% within the first three years.

Chances at success are very slim, yet Africans continue to see opportunity where many do not. The select few celebrated in this list represent those individuals who continue to persevere against the odds. It also serves as a reminder that it is possible.

“People don’t really give enough time or spend enough time in providing the right environment for entrepreneurs to grow,” Pau tells FORBES AFRICA.

So if entrepreneurship is the answer, ensuring that an environment is conducive for business sustainability is imperative.

Together with our audit partner for this list, SNG Grant Thornton, the senior editorial team worked night and day scrutinizing each candidate. For entrepreneurs, we delved into how profitable their businesses were and if they showed signs of potential growth and sustainability.

However, not only does the list look at the financial impact of each candidate, but also their reputation, resilience and ability to be role models to other young Africans.

For FORBES AFRICA, this meant endless background checks, fact-checks, emails, phone calls and research, sifting through over 1,000 nominations that poured in over the last few months. Lastly, the one factor that also played a role in the determination of the candidates was their online presence. Followers are a valuable new currency, and today’s achievers have found a way to leverage off them. This year, when FORBES named Kylie Jenner the world’s youngest self-made billionaire, it observed that her business was built mainly because of her social media and fan following. Many on our list have also been able to build on this in their own way. The creatives and sport stars lead in this regard.

This year, Sport is the newest category, opening up the list to the game-changers who are also Africa’s next generation of leaders. They have won awards, broken records, made social investments and pushed the boundaries by challenging the status quo on policies in sports. However, some of the challenges they still face include lack of resources, a gender pay gap, and an immense pool of untapped talent not yet given a chance to be in the limelight.

But no matter where they are from, these 120 list-makers share one common goal, and that is to build a better Africa.

Being an under-30 myself, I am proud to have curated the FORBES AFRICA 30 Under 30 class of 2019. At the time of going to press, all facts on the following pages were verified to be correct.

The list is in no particular order:


This year marks the fifth milestone annual FORBES AFRICA 30 under 30 list, and we have introduced a new category of game-changers. Together, they are 120 in total across four sectors: business, technology, creatives and sport. Meet the class of 2019, a stellar collection of entrepreneurs and innovators rewriting rules and taking bold new risks to take Africa to the future.

#30Under30: Business Category 2019
#30Under30: Creatives Category 2019
#30Under30: Technology Category 2019
#30Under30: Sport Category 2019
  • Words: Karen Mwendera    
  • Edited by: Unathi Shologu
  •  Assistant: Garreth Mtuwa  
  • Creative direction by: Lucy Nkosi  
  • Lead photography by: Motlabana Monnakgotla
  • Co-photography by: Gypseenia Lion   

Judges of the 30 Under 30 class of 2019

The category experts whose role it was to survey all finalists of the 2019 30 Under 30 list, rank them and provide commentary on each candidate:

  • Business: Anthea Gardner, Founder and Managing Partner at Cartesian Capital
  • Technology: Professor Tshilidzi Marwala, Vice-Chancellor and Principal at University of Johannesburg; he also deputises President Cyril Ramaphosa on the South African Presidential Commission on the Fourth Industrial Revolution.
  • Creatives: Yasmin Furmie, creative and business partner of fashion brand SiSi The Collection, South Africa
  • Sport: Nick Said, the Africa sports correspondent for Thomson Reuters
  • Audit partner: SNG Grant Thornton

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30 under 30

#30Under30: Sport Category 2019

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This year marks the fifth milestone annual FORBES AFRICA 30 under 30 list, and we have introduced a new category of game-changers. Together, they are 120 in total across four sectors: business, technology, creatives and sport. Meet the class of 2019, a stellar collection of entrepreneurs and innovators rewriting rules and taking bold new risks to take Africa to the future.


The list is in no particular order:

Clarence Munyai, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Motlabana Monnakgotla

1. Clarence Munyai, 21, South Africa

Track and Field Athlete

Clarence Munyai is right on track to becoming one of the world’s greatest athletes as he shatters more records.

Munyai is the third-fastest all-time junior in the 100 meters-race.

He currently holds the South African record of 19.69 in the 200 meters right under Usain Bolt who holds the record for 19:19.

Munyai also holds the Junior World Record of the 300 meters.

“I have been blessed with a talent to run fast and become a professional athlete, and am thankful every day for the opportunity to pursue my dreams and make a better life for myself and my family,” he tells FORBES AFRICA.

He made his mark in the 200 meters World Junior ranking in 2017 and 13th in the 200 meters world senior ranking the same year.

Last year, he smashed the 200 meters record in a time of 19.69 seconds, making him the 10th fastest in the world ever, as he knocked off Wayde van Niekerk’s mark of 19.84.

Munyai is one of the youngest South African Olympians of all time and has always remained modest on and off the track.

Kim Collins, 2003 world champion in the 100 meters, once told Munyai to ‘always stay humble’ as he was.

Despite his global achievements, he says there is no better feeling than wearing the country’s green and gold colors.

“My immediate plans are to win gold at the World Championships in Doha later this year, and then, of course, focus on Tokyo 2020. Apart from that, I know there is life after athletics and so am looking into various business opportunities,” he says.

Jean Sseninde, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

2.Jean Sseninde, 26, Uganda

Footballer and CEO

Jean Sseninde is one to watch on and off the pitch.

When she was eight years old, she began playing football with her brother in her home in Kasangati village in Uganda. That experience got the ball rolling.

She currently plays for the Ugandan national team.

Internationally, she plays for Queens Park Rangers W.F.C in the FA Women’s National League South in England, making her the first Ugandan female to sign with the team. Sseninde also previously played for the AFC Phoenix Women’s Football Club and the Charlton Athletic Women’s Football Club.

Although she enjoys an international career in football, her biggest highlight remains playing for her national team.

In 2016, the Uganda women’s National football team qualified to play in the semi-finals of the Council of East and Central Africa Football Association (CECAFA) Women Championships against Burundi.

“The only goal that was scored was from my assist,” she tells FORBES AFRICA.

Sseninde is the founder and CEO of the Sseninde Women’s Development Cup and the founder of the Jean Sseninde Foundation, which sponsors the annual Jean Sseninde Women Football Development Tournament, aimed at discovering and mentoring female soccer talent in Uganda.

Sseninde is also the first African and sole female player from the continent to join the Common Goal initiative an organization whose members pledge to give away at least 1% of their annual salary to charity.

Last year, she scooped an award for her philanthropic work at the Best Of Africa Awards event at the Rosewood in London.

Mohamed Salah, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

3. Mohamed Salah, 27, Egypt

Footballer

On June 1, 2019, the world watched as Liverpool made history, beating Tottenham Hotspur in the UEFA Champions League final as Egyptian-born Mohamed Salah led the team to victory.

Salah scored the first goal of the match and in the end, the team had a 2-0 victory. Dressed in the team’s shirt, red as his blood, and with curly locks, Salah raised the trophy with pride in celebration while immersed in a sea of red on the pitch.

He was this year’s only footballer on the list of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential that called him “one of the best football players in the world”.

The iconic figure started his professional career nine years ago playing for the Egyptian Premier League.

Thereafter, his career went international when he played for Basel, a team in Switzerland and then Chelsea.

In 2017, he then signed with Liverpool at a club-record fee of £36.9 million ($46.6 million).

He has since won numerous awards and accolades such as the PFA Players’ Player of the Year, the Football Writers’ Association Footballer of the Year and the PFA Fans’ Player of the Year. His next goal is to conquer the next season of the Premier League.

He is currently sponsored by Adidas and has appeared on Adidas commercials alongside David Beckham, Lionel Messi and Paul Pogba, and singer Pharrell Williams.

With a total of 148 goals scored in his professional clubs’ career, Salah is a name that will definitely go down in history books. He is one of the highest-earning sport stars in the world.

Wayde van Niekerk, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

4. Wayde van Niekerk, 26, South Africa

Track and Field Athlete

The man currently holding the world and Olympic record in the 400 metres was born in a small town in Kraaifontein, in Cape Town.

As a child, Wayde van Niekerk dreamed of being the fastest man in the world and he is evidence that dreams do, in fact, come true. The world took notice of him when he won gold at the World Championships in 2016.

Since then, he has shown no signs of slowing down.

He came first in the 2016 Olympic Games in the 400 meters in Rio de Janeiro, and again in the 2017 World Championships in London.

However, due to a knee injury, Van Niekerk was unable to participate in any games last year and he is still on his road to recovery.

After the long and painful wait, he returns to the track and is set to compete in the IAAF World Championships in Doha in September, alongside many other world stars. Usain Bolt, world record holder in the 100 metres and now Van Niekerk’s good friend, told FORBES AFRICA, when he visited South Africa this year, about what advice he gave the South African athlete.

“I always tell Wayde, ‘it is good to be fast and to be great, but if you want to build your brand you have to show your personality’. People will want you to be a part of their brand’,” Bolt said.

After news that he had temporarily withdrawn from athletics due to his injury, he showed love to his fans by tweeting that he was determined to race again. Many look forward to his return this month and, perhaps, more records to be broken.

“The race itself is a blank experience, I only remember the end. All stresses disappear right there. It’s about me giving my everything and leaving it all there on the track,” he told FORBES AFRICA after his 2016 win.

Chad le Clos, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

5. Chad le Clos, 27, South Africa

Swimmer

“Seas the day”, are words multiple Olympic medallist Chad le Clos lives by.

His claim to fame is being an Olympic, World and Commonwealth Games swimming champion.

He is also the record holder in the 50-meter and 100-meter butterfly.

Born in Durban, South Africa, Le Clos began swimming competitively from the age of 10.

By the time he was 20, he beat his hero, Michael Phelps, by 0.05 seconds at the London 2012 Summer Olympics in the men’s 200 meters butterfly, and the world stood still.

Phelps had held that record and the arrival of a young South African caused a huge splash.

History was made and Le Clos continues to do so today.

On top of the many accolades, last year, he was named FINA Male Swimmer of the Year 2018.

He is currently doing plenty of swimming drills in preparation for Tokyo 2020.

The proud South African swimmer goes to show that where there’s a will, there’s a wave.

Genzebe Dibaba, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

6. Genzebe Dibaba, 28, Ethiopia

Track and Field Athlete

Genzebe Dibaba is a woman always gunning for gold.

With 10 gold medals already to her name, she continues to run the distance and surpass many alongside her. She currently holds five world records; for the indoor and outdoor 1,500 meters, the indoor 300 meters, the indoor 500 meters and the indoor mile.

This makes her one of the best female track mile runners in history. The last two gold medals she won for Ethiopia were at the 2018 World Indoor Championships in Birmingham for the 1,500 meters and 3,000 meters.

The 28-year-old’s talents, however, run in the family. She has three siblings who are also gold and silver medal athlete winners.

The Ethiopian world record holder continues to run for her life as she remains unbeaten in the 1,500 meters since the European Championships in Berlin in 2015.

Since then, she has received a number of accolades, including the Laureus Sportswoman of the Year in 2015, and IAAF Athlete of the Year 2015.

Jacob Kiplimo, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

7. Jacob Kiplimo, 18, Uganda

Track and field athlete

Jacob Kiplimo can run for miles. At only 18, Kiplimo is a World Cross Country silver medallist.

He grew up in Bukwo on Mount Elgon in Uganda.

Making his debut internationally, he did what many 15-year-olds could only dream of.

He won the 10,000 meters bronze medal at the 2016 IAAF World U20 Championships.

His achievements put him in the running to be selected as part of Uganda’s Olympic team, making him one of the country’s youngest Olympians.

In 2017, he came first at the World Cross Country Championships in the junior men’s race.

Even when playing among the seniors, Kiplimo is still a top athlete.

This year, he was second at the World Cross Country Championships in Denmark.

According to the IAAF, he currently ranks fourth in the world for the men’s 10,000 meters.

As he continues to make a run for the top spot, he shows no signs of letting the dust settle.

Watch this space for more.

Sara Ahmed, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

8. Sara Ahmed, 21, Egypt

Weightlifter

Sara Ahmed is living proof that women can do absolutely anything and be great at it.

At only 21, she is the first Egyptian woman to receive an Olympic weightlifting medal.

Once, she had to miss her high school exams to compete at the 2016 Summer Olympics.

Through the sacrifice, she has a great support system lifting her every step of the way.

Ahmed’s passion for weightlifting comes from her father and older brother who were national competitors in weightlifting.

Among some of her accolades are nine international gold medals, including two golds won at the 2012 Junior African Championships and Youth African Championships.

Her most recent gold medal was last year at the World Junior Championships for 71kg.

Luvo Manyonga, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

9. Luvo Manyonga, 28, South Africa

Track and Field Athlete

Luvo Manyonga did not grow up with much but he had plenty to look forward to. When he started doing long jump in school, he fell in love with it instantly.

“Ever since, I wanted to break the world record,” he tells FORBES AFRICA.

And in 2017, he did just that, becoming the world champion as well as holding the first place in the world rankings.

The same year, he won South African Sportsperson of the Year and South African Sports Star of the Year. His goals this year are to defend the world championship title in Doha, break the nine-meter barrier and defend the Diamond League title.

“There is always life after sport and I am looking at various business opportunities because I know that it’s so important for an athlete to plan for post-career while still competing,” he says.

Giana Lofty, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

10. Giana Lofty, 24, Egypt

Martial Arts practitioner

Giana Lofty started practising karate when she was only six years old.

Now, she practises it internationally, representing her country.

Lofty is the current world title-holder and the 2014 continental title-holder, making the 24-year-old a certified two-time champion.

She won gold last year at the 2018 African Karate Championships in Kigali.

This year, she won silver at the Karate1 Premier League in Rabat, Morocco.

In an interview with Olympic Channel, she said, “I encourage girls to start practising karate or any martial arts for self-defence”.

She is one of over 1.5 million Egyptians doing so and one of the very few women dominating it. “Girls are not allowed to practise any kind of sport, not only karate. So, sometimes they say that what I’m doing is something useless which is against our beliefs. But I don’t think that, so I don’t care what they say,” she said.

It was a milestone for Lofty when in 2013, women were allowed to fight wearing a hijab, allowing her to do what she loves while still staying true to who she is.

Beatrice Chepkoech, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

11. Beatrice Chepkoech, 24, Kenya

Track and Field Athlete

She’s fast, tall and currently holds the world record for the 3,000 meters steeplechase, and her name is Beatrice Chepkoech.

After clocking a running time of 8:44.32 in 2018, the Kenyan became the first woman to break 8:50 and 8:45.

Her career started in 2014 as a road runner. She later switched to track and field in 2015, making that one of the best decisions she ever made.

Among some of the medals she bagged are the two gold medals she received last year; one at the 2018 Ostrava IAAF Continental Cup and the other at the 2018 Asaba Nigeria African Championships.

She is ahead of the pack and shows no signs of looking back.

Patricia Apolot, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Motlabana Monnakgotla

12. Patricia Apolot, 28, Uganda

Kickboxer

Patricia Apolot is not one to mess with. She once punched a fraudster and he landed in a drain.

With agility, grace and the heart of a lioness, Apolot’s fighting spirit has seen her winning world titles and putting Uganda on the map through kickboxing. Also known as the ‘Black Pearl’, Apolot started her career in 2014.

She grew up in Ngora, Uganda; her family was barely able to afford three meals a day or give her clothes to wear.

Enduring a disadvantaged life, there was only one thing on her mind as a child, to be ‘the world’s best’ and that’s exactly who she’s become, in her chosen field.

She is currently the reigning Ugandan female kickboxing champion and holds the International Kickboxing Federation title for lightweight.

She earned her title after beating Ivana Mirkov of Serbia in Dunaújváros, Hungary, in 2015.

This made her the first female Ugandan kickboxer to win this title.

She still holds the title and has been defending it for three years now, making her undoubtedly the queen of kickboxing.

Apolot shares her skills and talent training youngsters in kickboxing in her hometown in Uganda.

“I want to believe that a world or a sport without boundaries is a country or a sport well-spoken,” she says.

Caster Semenya, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Motlabana Monnakgotla

13. Caster Semenya, 28, South Africa

Track and field athlete

Caster Semenya is the name of the 800 meters queen dominating headlines in the sporting world.

She has won over 15 international gold medals and the South African golden girl has no intentions of stopping any time soon.

In a recent controversy (where the IAAF wants female athletes with high testosterone levels to take testosterone blockers), the Swiss Supreme Court denied the IAAF’s request to immediately reimpose the regulation on Semenya.

This means Semenya is free to compete without restriction in the female category until the IAAF and Athletics South Africa make submissions to the Supreme Court on her request that the IAAF regulations be suspended throughout the entire appeal process.

But Semenya is not moved and she continues to hold her head high. To many, she remains a champion winning on and off the field.

In an interview with FORBES WOMAN AFRICA late last year, she said: “I like to be myself, I am true to myself. I just like myself the way I am and I don’t want anything to change in me.

“When I walk onto that track, I perform. So, when I perform, I expect people to recognize my work but not just because I am me, but for the work that I do.”

Semenya has plans to continue racing, winning more golds and flying the South African flag high.

“I don’t see myself stepping down; until I’m 40, that’s when I’ll be satisfied,” she said. Some of her accolades include awards at the South African Sport Awards; the People’s Choice Sports Star of the Year, Sports Woman Of The Year, and the Sports Star Of The Year.

She was also nominated for the 2018 Female World Athlete of the Year at the IAAF Athletics Awards.

You cannot put a price tag on an athlete like Semenya. She describes herself as just being  “priceless”.

Emmanuel Korir, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

14. Emmanuel Korir, 24, Kenya

Track and Field Athlete

As the sixth ranked fastest athlete in the men’s 800 meters, of all time, Emmanuel Korir keeps flying Kenya’s flag high.

According to the IAAF, last year, he won all but one of his races.

He holds the record for the fastest outdoor time of the year, winning at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in London last year.

He clocked 1:42.05, making it the world’s fastest 800 meters performance since 2012.

He was nominated for the Male Athlete of the Year award in 2018 by the IAAF and won two gold medals at the African Championships, as well as the Continental Cup.

His current world ranking, according to the IAAF, is first place in the 800 meters.

He plans to set records at the World Championships in Doha this year.

“I can’t go and sleep even after the season ends. I have to work harder to be ready for Doha. It is a title that I long for in between now and then,” Korir told Capital Sports last year. He is also signed to Nike.

Faith Kipyegon, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

15. Faith Kipyegon, 25, Kenya

Track and field athlete

It is said that when Faith Kipyegon was a baby, she completely skipped the crawling stage and went straight to walking. She certainly has not stopped since.

Speaking to NTV Kenya, Mzee Kipyegon revealed that his daughter was extraordinary growing up.

As an adult, she is one of Kenya’s long-distance trailblazers.

Her last international race saw her winning gold and beating one of the world’s best, Caster Semenya, at the World Championships in London in 2017.

She recently returned to the track from maternity leave making her first return to action in two years, and is currently training for the next big race at the 2020 Olympics.

Kipyegon also won gold at the 2016 Summer Olympics and gold at the 2014 Commonwealth Games.

She has stood on pedestals with the world’s best, and will continue to stand tall.

Francine Niyonsaba, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

16. Francine Niyonsaba, 26, Burundi

Track and Field athlete

Francine Niyonsaba made history in 2016 when she won Burundi’s first Olympic medal in 10 years.

She won a silver medal, finishing second in the 800 meters Rio de Janeiro Olympics race.

She came second to her rival on the track and friend off the track, Caster Semenya.

Since then, she has gained speed at earning the gold medals at the 800 meters at the 2016 World Indoor Championships in Portland, and last year, at the World Indoor Championships in Birmingham.

For Niyonsaba, running had always been in her blood.

When speaking to FORBES AFRICA last year, she said that the challenge women face in Burundi is that they feel they can’t achieve anything elsewhere in the world.

“In Burundi, in our culture, women believe they cannot do something special in the world, but it is just a mentality,” she said. “A woman can do everything!”

This year, Niyonsaba revealed that she would be affected by the IAAF ruling on Semenya.

In an interview with Olympic Channel, she openly discussed her hyperandrogenism and the difficulties she has faced in becoming a top-level athlete.

“For sure, I didn’t choose to be born like this, what am I?…I love myself, I will still be Francine. I will not change,” she told them.

The 26-year-old is passionate about inspiring other women in sport and putting Africa on the map.

She ranks third in the Women’s 800m in the IAAF world rankings.

Kagiso Rabada, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

17. Kagiso Rabada, 24, South Africa

Cricketer

Kagiso Rabada’s bowling style is nothing short of a visual treat as he has been known to make many seasoned cricketers feel rather googly as his balls approach them.

Last year, he became the youngest bowler to take 150 test wickets, and Wisden named him the Best Young Player In The World.

His rise to fame in the cricket world was as fast as the balls he delivers.

He had his biggest year in 2016 as he went home with six awards at Cricket South Africa’s annual dinner, including the prize for Cricketer of the Year.

He currently is a fast bowler for the Highveld Lions, a South African cricket team, as well as the national team, the Proteas.

Off the field, Rabada, known as KG, is humble and grounded.

The cricket star founded an initiative called Inspire and Ignite under his foundation, the Kagiso Rabada Foundation. It was reported that early this year he sponsored 2,500 youth under the age of 25 with sports equipment to advance their talent and skills.

It’s best not to take your eyes off him.

Ruhan van Rooyen, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

18. Ruhan van Rooyen, 24, South Africa

Paralympic track and Field Athlete

Ruhan van Rooyen was born with cerebral palsy in his lower left arm and foot.

But that has not stopped him from representing his country internationally in track and field.

Van Rooyen is a Paralympics athlete from the Western Cape in South Africa specializing in the 100 meters and 200 meters T37.

He made his debut in 2013 when he was named Junior Athlete of the Year by the South African Sports Association for the Physically Disabled.

One of his biggest achievements was being selected to compete at the 2017 World Championships in London, England.

He ranked sixth in the World Championships at the 200 meters T37 and 100 meters T37, while locally, he ranked second in both events.

Next on his agenda is to compete at the 2020 Paralympic Games in Tokyo.

When he isn’t on the track, he doubles up as a YouTuber, enjoys cycling and is also pursuing a career as a chartered accountant.

His coach said in one of his YouTube videos that “Ruhan is a very dedicated athlete”.

“I really believe Ruhan has what it takes to, not only be top three in the world, but to be the best in his events which is the 100 and 200 meter sprints,” he said.

Sadio Mane, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

19. Sadio Mane, 27, Senegal

Footballer

Sadio Mané comes from Bambali, a village in Senegal where boys play street football until sunset with red earth clinging on to their clothes.

Now, Mané currently captains the Senegal National Team and is a winger for Premier League club Liverpool.

He started his career at a Senegalese football academy, then made his international debut for Metz, a French football team in 2012. He played for FC Red Bull Salzburg and Southampton before moving on to Liverpool in 2016 for a fee of £34 million ($43 million), making him the most expensive African player in history, at that time.

Last year, he scored a hat-trick for the club and overtook fellow countryman Demba Ba’s record of 43, to become the highest-scoring Senegalese in Premier League history.

Since then, he has become one of the top performers in the team.

He was joint recipient of the Premier League Golden Boot with 22 goals, and was part of the Liverpool team that won the 2019 UEFA Champions League Final.

With his impressive record in the Premier League, the Senegalese won Premier League Player of the Month in August 2017 and March 2019. He was also awarded the Premier League Golden Boot 2018 and 2019. On the continent, he has represented the Senegal national team at the 2012 Olympics, 2015 and 2017 Africa Cup of Nations, and the 2018 FIFA World Cup.

Speaking to BBC, Fodé Boucar Dahaba, the President of the Regional League, says that whenever Mané returns home, he remains humble and dressed in shorts like everyone else in the village.

Sabrina Simader, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

20. Sabrina Simader, 21, Kenya

Alpine skier

Sabrina Wanjiku Simader was born in Kilifi, a small town on the coastal city of Mombasa, Kenya, unaware that one day she would be conquering winter slopes in the alpine ski world.

Today, the 21-year-old Kenyan is a world-renowned ski racer.

But she is as humble as her early days on the mountain slopes.

She learned to ski in Hansberg, a small mountain in Austria. “Even as a little girl, I was fascinated by the white sparkling snow and the wonderful feeling of riding down the slopes,” she says. With some encouragement from her step-dad, a passionate skier at one time, she decided to pursue skiing. Her biggest achievement was when she became a triple Styrian champion in the Super G, giant slalom, combination and second in the Slalom in 2012.

“He was always proud of me and took a lot of time to train and support me in all races. Unfortunately, in June 2012, he died too early. For my mum and I, things became very difficult,” she says.

Her ski coach Christian Reif, coach of the Kenya National Ski Team, took on the ropes to groom her in the winter sport.

“Sabrina is for Kenya and for the whole world an inspiration, as a real Kenyan not from an alpine nation. And she shows that nothing is impossible, and you can reach anything with intensive work, effort and discipline,” he tells FORBES AFRICA.

Simader represented Kenya at the Winter Youth Olympics in 2016 in Lillehammer, Norway.

She was nominated for the Sports Woman of the Year and the Youth of the Year awards in the African Women in Europe organization 2017.

She plans to conquer the Winter Olympic Games in 2022 in China and the Alpine Ski World Championships in Italy in 2021, making her the second Kenyan after Philip Boit to represent the East African nation at the Winter Games.

She founded the Kenya Ski Association to groom other young Kenyans in the sport.

Gerson Domingos, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

21. Gerson Domingos,23, Angola

Basketballer

Gerson Domingos is one of the youngest players in the Angolan national basketball team and he plays a very important position, point guard.

He was named Most Valuable Player at The International Basketball Federation (FIBA) Africa U18 Championship 2014, and he is part of the new generation of Angola’s young talent.

He made his debut for the senior team in 2016 at the Belgrade FIBA Olympic Qualifying Tournament 2016. He wears Angola on his heart and hopes to go down in their history books.

In an interview with FIBA, he said: “I have always dreamed of playing against the best teams in the world, and if I am healthy, I will do everything to keep the Angolan flag flying high. We have a history of playing at big basketball events and I hope to be part of Angola’s successful history.”

Angola is ranked in the top 50 national teams according to FIBA world rankings.

Siya Kolisi, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

22. Siya Kolisi, 28, South Africa

Rugby player

Siya Kolisi stands as a dream fulfilled for the South African nation when he became the first-ever black captain of the Springboks.

It was exactly a year ago when he first captained South Africa’s national rugby team, the Springboks, on home turf against England while donning the number 6 jersey, the number famously worn by Nelson Mandela at the 1995 Rugby World Cup.

It was a step in the right direction, echoing Mandela’s vision which sought to unite a racially divided South Africa through rugby that year.

“Sport has the power to change the world… It has the power to inspire,” he said to the thousands.

Twenty-four years later, Kolisi has inspired many as well.

“I’ve learned that no matter where you come from, or what your background is, you can aspire to be whatever you want to be,” he said in an Instagram post.

Weighing 102kg, just shy of the average rugby player’s weight estimated to be 105.1kg, he carries the hopes of many on his shoulders.

He also captains the Stormers, a team which is part of the South African Rugby Union, and is based in the Western Cape province.

Despite his knee injury preventing him from playing, many hope for his return this month in a shortened Rugby Championship against Australia at Ellis Park in Johannesburg.

This year, Kolisi was nominated for a prestigious Laureus Sports Award under the category of Sporting Moment of the Year for his role in ‘uniting the rainbow nation’.

Thembi Kgatlana, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

23. Thembi Kgatlana, 23, South Africa

Footballer

The dusty grounds of Mohlakeng, a township west of Johannesburg, is where Thembi Kgatlana honed her talents.

Yet, on some of the world’s greenest international pitches is where she won her awards.

Whenever she gets the ball, she displays sophisticated athleticism, making it difficult to take your eyes off her as she leverages speed, agility and impressive dribbling skills to get the ball behind the net.

Kgatlana is a product of South Africa’s Banyana Banyana women’s football team, and she also plays for the Beijing BG Phoenix FC in the Chinese Women’s Super League.

She also previously played for Houston Dash in Texas, US.

When speaking to FORBES WOMAN AFRICA late last year, she said her goal had always been to play abroad and make a living out of her passion.

“It’s a dream I have been working towards for the whole of my life, since I started playing as an eight-year-old, working my way through the junior national teams, then to the senior national team. It’s been a long and hard road, but I’m here now,” Kgatlana said. After representing South Africa at the 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations, she was named Player of the Tournament and was the highest goal scorer.

Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

24. Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang, 29, Gabon

Footballer

If there’s one person who loves the biggest blockbuster movie of 2018, Black Panther, it is Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang. After scoring two goals for Arsenal against Rennes earlier this year, the footballer celebrated by wearing a Black Panther mask and did the signature pose with his two arms crossed over his chest

It was a true ‘Wakanda Forever’ moment.

When interviewed after the match by BT Sport, he said: “I needed a mask [which would] represent me so it’s Black Panther and in Gabon, we call the national team the panthers of Gabon, so it represents me.”

Loved by many back home, Aubameyang is a superhero in his own right. He has previously won African Footballer of the Year, Top Scorer and the French League Cup.

This year, he received the Golden Boot.

 The 29-year-old Gabonese professional footballer plays for the Arsenal in the Premier League and is the captain of the Gabon national team.

It seems the apple has not fallen far from the tree as, Aubameyang’s father, Pierre-François Aubameyang “Yaya”, is a retired Gabonese international and national footballer.

Aphiwe Dyantyi, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

25. Aphiwe Dyantyi, 24, South Africa

Rugby player

Last year, Aphiwe Dyantyi won the Breakthrough Player Year Award at the World Rugby Awards for his outstanding performance on the field.

An emotional Dyantyi accepted his award in Monte Carlo, Monaco.

“It’s been a blessing. I have been truly blessed in so many ways and the people that I have had around me, people that have helped me in the last few years have truly been amazing,” he said as part of his acceptance speech.

Dyantyi has been described as a natural-born player and his skills on the field can attest to that.

Coming from humble beginnings, he was born in Ngcobo in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa.

He plays for the South African national team, the Springboks.

He also plays for the Lions in Super Rugby, the Golden Lions in the Currie Cup and the Golden Lions XV in the Rugby Challenge.

He started his career in rugby while he was studying at the University of Johannesburg (UJ).

There, he played for the UJ senior team in the Varsity Cup before moving to play in the provincial championships.

Dyantyi not only strives to make a difference for his country but also for those around him.

Percy Tau, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

26. Percy Tau, 25, South Africa

Footballer

He plays for the Union SG and Premier League club Brighton & Hove Albion, and the South African national team, Bafana Bafana.

His football career started in 2013 when he played for Mamelodi Sundowns in the Premier Soccer League.

Since then, he has kicked it up a notch and has been climbing the football ladder. He made his debut with English Premier League club Brighton & Hove Albion last year, signing a four-year contract.

However, Tau experienced issues obtaining a UK work permit and was loaned out to join Union SG, a Belgium football club.

The loan was a blessing in disguise for Tau as he went on to score four goals for the team in six appearances, helping the club reach the semi-finals.

He then won the Player of the Season award and was in the league’s team of the season.

Last year, he was one of South Africa’s goal scorers as the nation recorded its largest-ever victory with a 6-0 win over Seychelles in an Africa Cup of Nations qualifier.

He won Premier Soccer League’s Player of the Season for 2017 to 2018.

But what makes this Mpumalanga-born South African one of the most talked-about footballers in the country?

When speaking to local publication Sport24, Tau expressed his love for football no matter where he plays.

“I think everyone is happy when they’re playing football, so, yeah… football is football. Regardless of where you play, if you focus on the football, then everything else becomes easier,” he said.

Quinton de Kock, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

27. Quinton de Kock, 26, South Africa

Cricketer

This Johannesburg-born 26-year-old is a wicketkeeper and batsman known for his fearless striking and handy glove work.

Early in his career, he has been compared to some of the greats in cricket like Adam Gilchrist and Mark Boucher.

Cricket experts have considered him to be one of the most promising young wicketkeepers of this decade.

He plays for the South African national team, the Proteas, a local team called the Titans and internationally, for the Mumbai Indians in the Indian Premier League.

He made his debut for the national T20 team against New Zealand in 2012, scoring 28 off 23 balls while chasing.

Since then, he has been making quite an impression in the sport.

He was named Cricketer of the Year at Cricket South Africa’s 2017 Annual Awards.

One of his other milestones is being the fastest South African to reach 1,000 ODI runs.

Alex Iwobi, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

28. Alex Iwobi, 23, Nigeria

Footballer

If your uncle is award-winning Nigerian professional footballer, Jay-Jay Okocha, it is possible those good genes would place you at the top tier of the football ladder.

Alex Iwobi is blessed to live up to his uncle’s legacy.

Iwobi has been described as smooth and dangerous with the ball.

At only 23, he is skilled on the pitch and shows promise as he is one of Africa’s rising football stars.

Iwobi currently plays for Premier League club Arsenal and the Nigerian national team, the Super Eagles.

He was born in Lagos, Nigeria, and left his home country at the age of four.

He joined Arsenal in 2004, however, started playing with the senior team in 2015.

In that same year, he started playing for Nigeria, making his debut at the 2016 Summer Olympics when he was selected for their 35-man provisional squad.

The following year, he scored for Nigeria in a 1-0 win over Zambia.

This secured the Super Eagles a spot at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia.

Speaking to BBC Sport earlier this year, he said he was proud to be related to Okocha.

“I can never get tired of people comparing us. I see my uncle as an idol, someone I have always looked up to as a footballer,” he said.

 “I still have a long way to go, maybe one day, I can be on his level or greater.”

Akani Simbine, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Motlabana Monnakgotla

29. Akani Simbine, 25, South Africa

Track and Field Athlete

Akani Simbine was born a winner.

Born in Kempton Park, South Africa, Simbine has lifted the coveted crown as the country’s fastest man.

He broke the South African record in the 100 meters with a time of 9.89 seconds in 2016, which became one of his personal bests. He further sped on to win more accolades.

His current world ranking position, according to the IAAF, is sixth on the men’s 100 meters.

Among the 10 international medals he has, five of them are gold.

Simbine has been nothing short of consistent; he remains one of South Africa’s best track and field champions. He currently has deals with Mercedes-Benz and Adidas.

Margaret Nyairera Wambui, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

30. Margaret Nyairera Wambui, 23, Kenya

Track and Field Athlete

Margaret Wambui won her first international gold medal when she was only 19, at the World Junior Championships in the US.

She went from running in a small town in Nyeri County, Kenya, to some of the world’s largest arenas.

Today, she has over four more international accolades, including a bronze medal from the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games.

By then, she had her signature celebration style ready, placing one hand on the hip and the other in the air with a triumphant beaming smile.

Last year, she earned herself a second spot at the Commonwealth Games in Australia, receiving the silver medal, after Caster Semenya.

Like Semenya, Wambui has also been faced with questions regarding her testosterone levels.

However, according to reports, she has not been forced to undergo tests for hyperandrogenism.

Her current world ranking, according to the IAAF, in the Women’s 800 meters is 15.

At only 23, Wambui has achieved only what some of her peers dream of.

Imagine what the next seven years have in store for her. A gold medal for Kenya is closer than we think.   

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30 under 30

#30Under30: Creatives Category 2019

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This year marks the fifth milestone annual FORBES AFRICA 30 under 30 list, and we have introduced a new category of game-changers. Together, they are 120 in total across four sectors: business, technology, creatives and sport. Meet the class of 2019, a stellar collection of entrepreneurs and innovators rewriting rules and taking bold new risks to take Africa to the future.


The list is in no particular order:

Karabo Poppy Moletsane, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Motlabana Monnakgotla

1. Karabo Poppy Moletsane, 27, South Africa

Creative Illustrator, Street Artist and Graphic Designer

Not only is Karabo Poppy Moletsane an artist aiming for the skies, but you can see some of her work from there too.

In the Zoo Lake public park in Johannesburg, two basketball courts are adorned with her creativity.

From a bird’s eye-view, you can see one in blue with a crocodile on it and another in turquoise with a cheetah on it.

Together with another local artist, they designed the courts in collaboration with Nike.

Moletsane is also responsible for tagging the famous landmark in Soweto,  the Soweto Towers, which can be seen miles away and has become a source of kasi (township) pride.

Moletsane’s goal has been to put black female illustrators on the map.

In 2015, she turned her passion for art into a business and founded Mother Tongue-Creative House which is now trading under her own name, Karabo Poppy.

“This was a five-year journey that started with me only having one month of work experience, living with family and friends, and chartering my own course without scripts for success,” she tells FORBES AFRICA.

She has won three Loerie Awards over the course of her career, and her work has been recognized as part of a Grammy-nominated music video Makeba, by French singer and artist, Jain.

Poppy was also the first black female artist to paint the Art Wall in the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive in California.

For international woman’s day in March 2018, she was also the artist behind the sequential Google doodle.

Her contribution to the world has been contemporary African aesthetics and she continues to do so.

Rophnan Nuri, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

2. Rophnan Nuri, 29, Ethiopia

Electronic Dance Music Artist

At the age of 10, Rophnan Nuri released his first mixtape, singing and playing the drums with his classmates, and he has not stopped moving to his own beat since.

He self-funded his career with the money he made as a club DJ and over the years, he learned the technical side of music and produced his own distinct sound.

“I was always fascinated by the fusion of different instruments and voices, and created a unique niche for myself by amalgamating traditional Ethiopian sounds from the past with futurist electronic music,” he says.

Nuri’s talent also saw him being one of the three African DJs chosen by South African DJ, Black Coffee, to perform in Ibiza Spain in 2017.

In 2018, he received awards in three categories at the 2018 Leza Awards in Ethiopia.

In the same year, he featured on a song titled Get To Work by Major Lazer, a popular American electronic dance music trio.

Despite his global impact, Nuri says he will always stay true to his Ethiopian roots, one of the reasons why he is most loved by his fellow Ethiopians.

“Getting recognition and support in my home country is unparalleled. My ability to engineer traditional instruments and merge them with popular sounds has earned me incredible support in the form of sold-out performances,” he says,

He continues to share his love for music through the Ethiopian DJ Association, nurturing up-and-coming talent.

Henry Amponsah, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

3. Henry Amponsah, 27, Ghana

Designer, Founder and CEO: 101 Clothing

Henry Amponsah knew he was going to be a designer from a young age.

“I remember when I told my mum I wanted to be a designer in the future, she angrily said, ‘what will be the use of gaining education only to be sitting in a container sewing clothes for chicken change?’ That got me laughing out loud and I said to myself ‘I will prove this lady wrong in the future’,” he tells FORBES AFRICA.

And Amponsah did just that.

While in high school, he and four friends had a photoshoot with outfits that cost $150 and they posted the photos on social media.

“The collection went viral and clients started talking to me,” Amponsah says.

The recognition pushed him to officially start his business, 101 Clothing, in 2014, and the rest was a stitch in time.

Today, Amponsah has dressed Samira Bawumia, the wife of Ghana’s Vice President. He also runs a foundation that helps with basic school equipment and workshops.

To date, he has received over 10 local and international awards and featured in many magazines including British Vogue magazine.

In the end, Amponsah managed to fulfil his dream and that of his mom’s; he built his fashion house and his now gunning for a PhD.

Austin Malema, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

4. Austin Malema, 28, South Africa

Photographer and CEO: Pixel Kollective

While some opt to invest in shares or property, Austin Malema opted to invest in memories and everything clicked into place.

Instead of celebrating his 21st birthday with a party, he used the money to buy his first camera, which cost R18,000 ($1,200).

He began shooting at events, which led to more bookings and he realized that the lens gave him  greater access to musicians, actors and prominent people.

Since then, Malema has photographed for many brands globally and for events such as the South African Music Awards, the South African Film and Television Awards and the Global Citizen Festival.

His work has also led to him photographing popular musicians such as Drake, Joey BadA$$, AKA, Casper Nyovest, Beyoncé and Jay-Z.

In 2018, when FORBES AFRICA 2018 30 Under 30 alumni, Thuso Mbedu, was nominated for an International Emmy, he was her official photographer in New York.

Apart from his exposure, Malema has turned his passion for photography into a business.

Last year, he founded his first company, Pixel Kollective, with his two partners, Kelly Leuuw and Sivuyile Matsiliza.

“My biggest dream is for the company to represent young black photographers around South Africa,” he tells FORBES AFRICA.

Harmony Katulondi, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

5. Harmony Katulondi, 29, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Presenter, Model, Actor and Voice Over Artist

Harmony Katulondi is a jack of all trades, and definitely a name to remember.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo-born presenter first fell in love with acting and presenting when he moved to South Africa as a toddler.

“I remember going over lines with my parents and stepping into new worlds every time I got on to the stage. I loved the smiles, joy and awe it brought into people’s eyes when they saw me,” he says.

However, when he was in university, it was nothing close to that feeling.

One day, while studying, a friend told him of a casting gig where they needed tall people.

He applied and it turned out to be  African Fashion International.

“I got there, walked, and they loved it, but I needed an agent. They told me to go upstairs and I signed with my current agency and so the casting life began. Commercial here, fashion week and catalogues there. That lead to TV shows, stints on Generations: The Legacy, and Skeem Saam,” he tells FORBES AFRICA.

However, there was one goal he aimed to achieve; being a Top Billing presenter. Katulondi auditioned for the Top Billing presenter search three times and didn’t make it.

Disappointed, this prompted him to start his own company in 2016, Harmony Katulondi Pty Ltd, a creative consultancy company.

Two years later, the presenter search came around again but Katulondi was not eager until his friends pushed him to.

In the end, Katulondi got the part. His talent saw him doing voice-overs for the Black Panther movie campaign. He is also the founder of a non-profit called Just Love to help those in need by doing outreaches such as feeding schemes, fundraising, skills development and environmental clean-ups.

Kapasa Musonda, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

6. Kapasa Musonda, 29, Zambia

Fashion Designer

In 2011, Kapasa Musonda returned to a non-existent fashion industry in her home country, Zambia, after living in the US for six years.

She had just obtained her Associate of Arts Advanced Study degree with a Magna Cum Laude, but had nowhere to use it.

“I had no choice but to open my own design business if I was to survive and make a living at what I knew best,” she says.

This birthed her business and fashion house, Mangishi Doll, that same year.

It is a Zambian ‘Afro-Eclectic’ clothing brand inspired by bold prints and an artistic expression of design and style.

Along the way, Musonda has made enough money to hire two permanent tailors and train five women in advanced fashion design.

In 2017, her garments were retailing at a boutique in Los Angeles and that caught the eyes of many US celebrities.

Among them was iconic actor Angela Bassett, who wore her garments to the American Black Film Festival Honours in Hollywood.

“We were elated and honored and after Angela Bassett wore our piece, we had the biggest growth spurt we had ever experienced,” she says.

It was not long before the BET Awards 2018 invited her for an exclusive fashion event where she presented a 24-piece collection.

From a three-year-old armed with a sewing machine, to taking on the world with couture and elegance, Musonda continues to put African print on the map.

Richard Akuson, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

7. Richard Akuson, 26, Nigeria

Founder and Editor: A Nasty Boy

Richard Akuson’s activism for LGBTQ+ and challenging gender norms resulted in him being named one of the 40 most powerful people in Nigeria under the age of 40 in the 2017 YNaijaPower List.

He founded A Nasty Boy, a magazine that is a fashion platform celebrating alternative and creative ideas, forms of expression and lifestyles, particularly in the LGBTQ+ community.

It was named one of Vogue’s ‘What to Read This Fall’ in 2017.

“That’s pretty radical, given the political climate and culture there,” Vogue said. Akuson is a lawyer by profession, but dove into this creative activism after experiencing a brutal homophobic attack.

He sought asylum in the US and grew his platform into a global brand.

A Nasty Boy has since created a safe space to have meaningful conversations for people persecuted for being part of the LGBTQ+ community.

But Akuson plans to take it a step further. “Through collaborations with American institutions, I’d like to focus my time as a licensed American lawyer on pro-LGBTQ+ rights policy advocacy in Africa,” he tells FORBES AFRICA.

He is currently writing a memoir about his journey to the US and co-producing as well as co-directing a documentary series about the lived experiences of African asylum-seekers in the US.

Menzi Mcunu, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

8. Menzi Mcunu, 22, South Africa

Founder: Afrocentric Gentlemvn

Menzi Mcunu is one of South Africa’s best-dressed young men, and he gets paid for it.

His notable look is a well-tailored suit, tie, top hat and a swag oozing elegance and grace.

Not bad for a 22-year-old.

He has graced the covers of, not one, but two magazines and his biggest highlight was being part of GQ South Africa’s Best Dressed Men for 2017.

Internationally, he has attended Milan Fashion Week in 2018 and has been featured on Vogue Italia, GQ Russia and GQ Australia.

It all started when he visited Mumbai, India, in 2013.

He was inspired by the Indian culture and its attention to detail in fashion.

As a result, he founded Afrocentric Gentlemvn, an African lifestyle brand that merges European aesthetics and African elegance with suit measurement and creative consultancy services.

“I knew nothing about the technical side or production side of selling garments but I wanted to depict suits differently. I didn’t want them to just be suits like the ones I saw at many retailers but I wanted them to represent a lifestyle,” he tells FORBES AFRICA.

Mcunu plans to grow his platform, Afrocentric Gentlemvn, globally.

He has also been interested in the development of African luxury and African fashion on the continent.

Trevor Stuurman, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

9. Trevor Stuurman, 26, South Africa

Photographer and Creative Director

CNN describes Trevor Stuurman as a cultural force, and indeed he has illustrated that.

Living up to these titles, he has had the opportunity to document former US President, Barack Obama, The Carters (Beyoncé and Jay Z) as well his mentor and someone he considers a sister, Naomi Campbell.

He was born and raised in the diamond city of Kimberley in South Africa’s Northern Cape.

After studying film, he was drawn to a different medium of visual arts – photography.

As a result, he became a self-taught photographer; in fact, one of South Africa’s most sought-after photographers.

“The more I leave home, the more I realize the power and currency that home has. And I think that it makes me a better story-teller because I am able to find pieces of home wherever I go and then create tangible products,” he says.

This essence of belonging inspired him to host his first solo exhibition titled Home, a love letter to the Himba women of Namibia, at the HAZARD Gallery in Johannesburg.

He has received recognition such as being on GQ South Africa’s Most Connected and Most Influential Man list 2018, Mail and Guardian’s Top 200 Young South Africans 2015, and Destiny Magazine’s Power of 40 List. Stuurman is also a contributor to British Vogue.

He plans to have his work live in museums and art galleries around the world and ultimately, to cultivate a space for more young story-tellers on the continent to share their lived African experiences through their own lenses.

Burna Boy, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

10. Burna Boy, 28, Nigeria

Musician

Early this year, Burna Boy took his Nigerian music fire to the US and ended up selling out the iconic Apollo Theatre in New York City where previous African legends like Fela Kuti, Miriam Makeba and Black Coffee were once hosted.

He was also one of the major artists to perform this year at Coachella, one of the world’s biggest music and arts festival.

Born Damini Ogulu, he is undoubtedly one of the hottest African recording artists right now and a name to remember.

The Afro-fusion singer and songwriter rose to fame after his lead single Like to Party was released in 2012.

Since then, he has moved to his own beat, releasing hit after hit each year.

Some of the world’s favorites include Dangote, Ye, On the Low, Soke, and Hallelujah, each reaching over three million views on YouTube.

Of the many accolades, he has won Best Album of the Year, Best Pop Artist of the Year at the Nigerian Entertainment Awards in 2015, and recently received four awards at the Soundcity MVP Awards Festival.

His third studio album Outside was hailed by Pulse Nigeria and Nigerian Entertainment Today as the best Nigerian album of 2018.

Kim Jayde, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

11. Kim Jayde, 28, Zimbabwe

TV Presenter, Model and MC

It’s not every day that one gets to meet the world’s biggest names such as Charlize Theron, Naomi Campbell, Major Lazer, Ciara, Paris Hilton, Tyler Perry and Trevor Noah.

But Harare-born Kim Jayde has.

Since she moved to South Africa, she has been landing major gigs, making her undoubtedly one of Zimbabwe’s ‘it girls’ at the moment.

You may have seen her on your screens on MTV Base Africa as a presenter, but she has also worked with brands like Revlon, Coca-Cola, Ackermans, Accessorize (London) and more.

“My story of being discovered by MTV Africa on Instagram and then going on to become the face of the channel is proof that anything is possible, with hard work, dedication and passion,” she says.

Among the many awards was the Media Personality of The Year at the 2018 Zimbabwe Achievers Awards.

She was also listed as one of the 40 Under 30 class of Emerging Zimbabwe Leaders by Gumiguru and not to mention took home her first international award for Woman in Media at the fifth annual Zimbabwe International Women’s Awards.

However, when the cameras aren’t rolling, Jayde still uses her degree in social work contributing to the Home of Hope For Girls; something she has always been passionate about.

Petite Noir member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Motlabana Monnakgotla

12. Petite Noir, 28, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Singer, Songwriter and Producer

From the African soil to some of the world’s greatest stages, Petite Noir embodies a modern African renaissance through his music and art.

He once opened for American Grammy award-winning singer Solange Knowles while she was on her 2013 US tour and performed at the South by Southwest festival in Texas.

In the 70s, an Angolan woman and Congolese man fell in love.

But due to the political instability in both countries, they fled to Belgium in search of  a new start.

That new start birthed Yannick Ilunga, now popularly known as Petite Noir.

In 1993 they then moved to Cape Town where his love for music was awakened.

“I really started to fall in love with music at the age of 15. It was something that I automatically felt drawn to, so much so that I immersed myself in various music projects as much as I could,” Noir tells FORBES AFRICA.

In 2012, he released his first single Till We Ghosts, which caught the eye of a music manager in the UK and wasting no time, Noir moved there.

The next year was his big break.

He signed a £80,000 ($103,305) deal and embarked on his first world tour, which spanned Africa, the UK, Europe and America.

“I toured with Solange and Foals [British rock band]; I played at festivals with line-ups that included the likes of Kendrick Lamar, Angélique Kidjo and many more,” he says.

Since then, his career has been nothing short of greatness.

Together with his wife, Rochelle ‘RhaRha’ Nembhard, he has been working on a charity called the Noirwave foundation.

Noir is currently working on his own festival called ‘No Borders’, a celebration of the journey of immigrants through art and music.

Among some of his accolades is the South African Music Award 2016 for Best Alternative Album for La Vie Est Belle/Life is Beautiful.

The same year, he also received recognition for the album artwork and the video Best exhibited in the African art gallery at Harvard University.

With Solange inviting him to play in the US and American musician Mos Def being one of his advisors, Petite Noir is a name to remember and a wave to catch on to.

Aisha Baker, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

13. Aisha Baker, 29, South Africa

Businesswoman, Influencer and Style Icon

There are a few names that have become synonymous with South Africa’s authority in the digital beauty industry and Aisha Baker is one of them.

Baker founded BakedOnline in 2009 when the blogging trend was fledgling in South Africa.

“I loved fashion, since I was introduced to Vogue Pattern books by my seamstress grandmother; I also loved literature and writing. It was a natural progression for me,” she tells FORBES AFRICA.

At the age of 20, she began monetizing it.

“I had accidentally formed a media company without knowing. Having one employee at the time, my photographer Tegan Smith, who worked only for petrol money and great images,” she says.

For one year, Baker worked a nine-to-five job at an embroidery factory to fund her business and would shoot content for her blog on weekends.

It was a stressful time.

“I got admitted to the ER because I thought I was having a heart attack. Turns out it was an ulcer caused by stress,” she says.

Ten years later, her brand has since stayed relevant and picked up some awards along the way.

She graced the cover of the 2018 influencer issue of Cosmopolitan South Africa.

She has worked with brands such as Estée Lauder, Mercedes-Benz, Cotton, Mac, Woolworths and Microsoft to name a few.

Most recently, she was awarded the E! Africa Social Media Award at their Pop of Culture awards.

Karun, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

14. Karun, 24, Kenya

Musician

You might know Karun from the pop trio Kenyan group Camp Mulla, nominated for a BET Award in the US in 2012.

But this alternative R&B pop artist is now taking on the world solo and is one of Kenya’s rising new wave artists.

Born Karungari Mungai, she started her music career at 14 and went on to attend the prestigious Berklee College of Music in the US.

Since then, she has had the opportunity to perform at live festivals and shows across the globe such as the SXSW 2015 (Austin TX) as part of the collective Cosmic Homies.

Karun also performed at the Madaraka Festival (Seattle), Blankets & Wine in Kenya and most recently, the Africa Nouveau Festival, Kenya’s most forward-thinking electric three-day music festival.

She has been covered by publications such as The Fader and OkayAfrica and local Kenyan publications such as The Daily Nation.

The young artist is currently working on a full-length project, and is in the process of planning a pan-African and northern hemisphere tour.

“The goal is to be the biggest female R&B act out of Africa. Watch this space,” she tells us.

Gilmore Moyo, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

15. Gilmore Moyo, 29, Zimbabwe

Creative Director, Fashion Facilitator, Former TV & Radio Host and Founder: Paper Bag Africa

Gilmore Moyo was named one of the 100 Most influential Zimbabweans Under 40 for 2018, alongside politician Nelson Chamisa and Minister of Sports, Arts and Recreation, Kirsty Coventry.

Moyo is known for his contribution to the Zimbabwean media and art scene.

He hosted and produced a radio show on Cliff Central, and also Thatha Wena, a conversational pan-African TV show.

Apart from his on-air talent, he also founded Paper Bag Africa, a content creation, public relations and management company.

His biggest highlight in the business was attaining a contract to manage the European Union Film Festival 2018 and 2019, which ran over five days and showcased 10 films.

“Being an entrepreneur in Zimbabwe is the most difficult thing one has to go through. Funding is not available for you to grow your business and opportunities to attain money aren’t easily visible,” he reflects.

Despite the challenges, he is optimistic about the future.

“Our ultimate goal is to become the ‘go to’ establishment for authentic African content,” he says.

Boitumelo ‘Boity’ Thulo, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

16. Boitumelo ‘Boity’ Thulo, 29, South Africa

TV Host, Entrepreneur and Musician

Boitumelo ‘Boity’ Thulo wanted to pursue a career in criminology and psychology, but instead, has become one of the most recognized stars in South Africa’s entertainment industry.

To think that her career started almost 10 years ago when she was cast in a lead role in an advert for an international restaurant chain, Thulo has since dabbled in various parts of the entertainment industry including TV hosting, acting, and music.

“There are so many highlights and standout moments in my career. But the one that always gives me goosebumps is my lead role on the Fergusons’ Rockville [in 2013]. That role is what paved the way to ‘Boity’ becoming a household name. I will forever be grateful to Connie and Shona Ferguson for believing in and trusting me with such a big role,” she says.

Today, she also wears the entrepreneurial hat after founding Boity Toning Support, a weight loss supplement.

Last year, Thulo recorded her debut single Wuz Dat featuring Nasty C, also a former FORBES AFRICA 30 under 30 list-maker.

The song was nominated for best collaboration at the SA Hip Hop awards.

Thulo stays right on script as she further pursues acting, music, as well as developing more health products and nutritional supplements. 

Hermann Kamte, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

17. Hermann Kamte, 27, Cameroon

Architect, Founder and CEO: Hermann Kamte & Associates

At 26, Hermann Kamte delivered a keynote speech alongside Rwandan President Paul Kagame and Egypt’s President, Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, during the Africa 2018 Forum at Sharm el Sheikh, in Egypt.

He was invited to speak about the future of African cities from the perspective of a creative architect.

This has been one of his biggest highlights to date and this is the only beginning.

Kamte is an award-winning Cameroonian architect with flair.

He founded Hermann Kamte & Associates, an architectural firm that provides design, landscape, education, research and development services.

One of his most notable works is the ‘Lagos’ Wooden Tower’ that won him the American Architecture Award as well as the World Architecture Festival and Awards’ inaugural WAFX Prize in 2017, known as the world’s most forward-looking concept.

“I think the desire to be an entrepreneur was very important alongside the fear to fail,” he says.

“Being able to offer a useful service to the community is the first thing that drives my passion for architecture. I have to be a model for younger generations; I want to create a safe and secure environment for people, with sustainable projects,” he adds.

Kamte is well on his way to building a better tomorrow.

Helen Chukwu, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

 18. Helen Chukwu, 25, Nigeria

Fashion Designer, Founder and CEO: Helen Couture

Helen Chukwu is cut from a different cloth and it is no surprise that her designs have featured on Vogue Arabia.   

She started dressing up dolls as a child, and now dresses up brides for a living.

At the age of 18, she became the founder and CEO of her design house, Helen Couture, which currently has operations in Nigeria, London and Dubai.

One of her memorable highlights was a private showcase in London and having her dress worn by Katie Cleary, America’s Next Top Model Cycle 1 contestant, at the 2013 Oscar Party. She is currently in the process of stocking her products in two stores each in the US, France and Italy.

She and her team have started drawing up plans to raise capital and build a 10,000 garment-production-per-day garment manufacturing factory in Nigeria by 2021.

Luis Munana, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

19. Luis Munana, 27, Namibia Creative Director, Model, TV

Host and Founder: Voigush Africa

You might remember his face from the ninth season of the reality television series Big Brother Africa, in 2014.

Since then, Luis Munana has been able to use his reality TV star status to good use.

Munana is a creative director of a children’s TV show he founded in 2017 called Waka Waka Moo.

The original animated cartoon and puppet program became one of the first in Namibia.

“I was baby-sitting my niece and nephew and I saw them recite every single word from cartoons created in the western world. So, I decided to create Namibia’s own cartoon and puppet show translated in all 11 Namibian languages. So, Waka Waka Moo was created,” he tells FORBES AFRICA.

The animations educate children about Namibia’s history, culture and heritage.

He has managed to expand Waka Waka Moo from being on TV to a tour reaching 44 rural primary schools in the country. 

As for the hosting side of his career, Munana founded Voigush Africa, a lifestyle, fashion and entertainment TV show in 2014 inspired by the South African entertainment market.

“While studying in South Africa, I would go to auditions to shows like V Entertainment, Top Billing and MTV Base Africa but they would always tell me I am not South African. So, I came home and created my own show,” he says.

Voigush has since covered music, lifestyle and fashion events across Africa which Munana produces, directs, scripts and edits himself.

As a jack of all trades, Munana proves that one can be talented both on and off screen.

Upile Chisala, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

20. Upile Chisala, 24, Malawi

Author and Poet

Upile Chisala started writing at the age of four.

By the time she started primary school, there were piles of paper with little stories scattered around her house, in Zomba, Malawi, which was already chock-a-block with books. 

But it took her years to embrace her talent.

After moving to the US, she studied sociology and graduated in 2015 but struggled to find a steady job.

She turned to poetry for comfort and self-published her first book at the age of 21.

It was her first collection of poetry called Soft Magic.

She continued her studies and enrolled for an MSc in African studies at the University of Oxford.

She revisited her writing and published a book called Nectar in 2017.

This brought the opportunity to travel and do readings, but it was when she traveled to Johannesburg, South Africa, that her talent was reaffirmed.

“The room was filled with over 200 people who didn’t mind that there were no seats left for them. They were happy to stand and listen to me read from both books,” she says.

Next, she received an email from two Folio Literary Management agents in New York City.

In no time, Chisala signed a three-book deal with Andrews McMeel Publishing worth ‘hundreds of thousands US dollars’.

Since then, she founded Khala Series, a monthly mentorship program for writers in Johannesburg.

All profits from this series are donated.

“Khala is my way of giving back to the community,” she says.

Joseph Awuah-Darko, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

21. Joseph Awuah-Darko, 22, Ghana

Contemporary Artist

In a dump site in Ghana near its capital Accra, Joseph Awuah-Darko stands holding a laptop in one hand and a face mask in another, like something out of an apocalypse movie.

He is dressed in orange overalls and there is e-waste as far as the eye can see; and the burning of the contents creates arid smoke in the background. 

Darko is a contemporary artist, art collector and dealer and co-founder of the NGO, Agbogblo.Shine Initiative. The organization, which started in 2017, encourages people working at the dump to turn waste into high-end furniture.

His aim was to highlight the importance of the, “circular economy in the face of electronic waste degradation”.

While enrolled at Ashesi University in Ghana, he began educating himself about the obscure art market.

His first major sale was a 3D-printed Ife Head he sold privately to a buyer for $11,000 in 2017. Since then, more clients kept coming, trading the value of trash wish cash and this resulted in him becoming the Managing Director of Africa Modern Art Fund at the young age of 22.

He presented a solo exhibition at Gallery1957; making him the youngest African contemporary artist to do so.

Prior to his contemporary art collector days, Darko was a musician under the alias ‘Okuntakinte’.

Darko is well on his way to getting a piece of the estimated $60 billion global contemporary art industry.

Joe ‘Human’ Nawaya, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

22. Joe ‘Human’ Nawaya, 25, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Graphic designer and Co-founder: Creative Mind Space

Joe ‘Human’ Nawaya was once enrolled for a degree in design at Pearson Institute in South Africa.

However, due to lack of finances, he had to drop out.

“At this point, I concluded that my life had stopped, I wasn’t going to be able to be anybody or make something of myself,” he tells FORBES AFRICA. However, this is not the design of his life as he was named Fast Company SA’s Top 20 Under 25 thanks to his passion and determination to pursue his first love, graphics and design.

His creative journey started when he was a child.

When his parents bought him a computer, the first application he used was paint.

Taking his passion to another level, he co-founded Creative Mind Space, together with his business partner Elliot Sithole.

It is an agency that focuses on creating content, designs, strategies, animation, and websites for brands.

Nawaya has been featured by Destiny Man as part of their Bold and Distinguished edition, positioning him as one of the most creative content creators in South Africa. Additionally, Nawaya went on to become a lifestyle ambassador for Bespoken Man, a gentleman grooming brand focused on lifestyle and experience.

While there, he worked with brands like Jameson Irish Whiskey, MINI Cooper and Savanna Dry.

Nawaya currently co-hosts #TheThreadedExchange with Siya Beyile, a former FORBES AFRICA 30 UNDER 30 list-maker, on CliffCentral.

He has also recently launched a podcast called Pioneers vs Pretenders on Lutcha, a digital podcasting company, which hosts a variety of podcasts online.

Thando Thabethe, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Motlabana Monnakgotla

23. Thando Thabethe, 29, South Africa

Actress, TV Presenter, and Radio DJ

Thando Thabethe is a jack of all trades.

She’s a prominent name in South Africa’s entertainment industry and has come to take it all.

Her acting career rose to prominence in early 2014 after her role on the South African soapie, Generations: The Legacy.

Her radio career dates back to the early days of 2008, having presented on the radio station of the University of Johannesburg.

But today, both her radio and acting careers have blossomed.

She currently has her own weekday radio show called The Thabooty Drive.

As for her acting, she moved from the small screen to the big screen, starring in the 2016 film Mrs Right Guy, the 2018 film Housekeepers and most recently, the lead role in 2019’s box office hit Love Lives Here.

This year, she was nominated for best TV host and best talk show for Thando Bares All, which aired on TLC, and she walked away with the award for Best Talk show.

 “Focus on your own focus. I think when you follow your heart and you follow your own passion, everything else follows and those that need recognize and follow it will,” she tells us.

Some of her achievements include being nominated for a SAFTA as the Best TV Presenter and for the Liberty Radio Awards as Best Drive Time presenter and for Best Drive Time Show.

Rich Fumani Mnisi, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

24. Rich Fumani Mnisi, 27, South Africa

Fashion Designer

When Beyoncé Knowles-Carter came to South Africa for the Global Citizen Festival in December, she was spotted wearing items of clothing by local designer Rich Mnisi.

She was adorned in the custom RICH MNISI Rhundzu blouse and crocodile half-pleat skirt.

“Growing up, all I have always wanted to do was to design clothes that reflect my own energy and the love of coloring outside the lines. I have dreamed of my favorite icons wearing my clothes like any kid dreams of meeting their icons. Protect your dreams with all you have because they have the power to define your destiny,” he said in an Instagram post after celebrating the iconic musician wearing his clothes.

In the short amount of time that Mnisi has been in the fashion industry, he has turned heads in South Africa’s fashion industry and internationally, featuring in publications like Vogue Italia, GQ, Financial Times, Marie Claire, ELLE and Vogue Russia.

Mnisi is a graduate of LISOF (Leaders in the Science of Fashion) and was awarded the Africa Fashion International Young Designer of the Year 2014.

He also owns a furniture brand consisting of a chaise and a stool titled Nwa-Mulamula, after his late great-grandmother.

He is also the designer of the red Coca-Cola outfit worn by Karabo Poppy on the cover of the 2019 FORBES AFRICA 30 Under 30 list.

Kevin Njue, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

25. Kevin Njue 27, Kenya

Producer, Director, Writer and CEO: Rocque Pictures

At university, Kevin Njue and his partner used his student loan of $200 to direct and produce a short film that he had written in hostel. The film, Sticking Ribbons, was released in 2013 and Njue went on to win the award for Best East African Talent at the 2014 Zanzibar International Film Festival.

Njue used the monetary reward of $1,000 to invest in his next short film, Intellectual Scum, which went on to screen in 15 film festivals globally.

“I was proud to thought-provoke the audience on the unequal racial relationships in Africa’s cultural and political landscape,” he tells FORBES AFRICA.

After gaining experience creating short films, Njue decided it was time to make bigger ones, a full-length feature film.

This ultimately led to him founding a business in 2016, Rocque Pictures.

With only enough money just to register the business, he knocked on doors while pitching his first feature film, 18 HOURS.

Of the $45,000 dollars needed, he managed to raise $13,000 from a university professor and an entrepreneur. In the end, the film was finished and launched in November 2017. It sold out at a cinema premiere in Nairobi.

In 2018, the film won the Best Overall Movie in Africa, Africa Magic Viewers’ Choice Awards, making history as the first Kenyan film to be nominated and win in the history of the awards.

 “As the CEO of Rocque Pictures, the goal is to set up a state-of-the-art film studio with a sound stage, backlot, a film park and an underwater film stage in Nairobi by 2030,” he says.

Sho Madjozi, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

26. Sho Madjozi, 27, South Africa

Musician

Sho Majozi won the hearts of South Africans in the early days of 2017 and seemingly, everything she touches burst into a euphoric cornucopia of color in celebration her African heritage. 

She introduced herself to the world as a Tsonga rapper with hits like Gqi, Huku, Kona, Wakanda Forever, and recently Idhom, bringing the XiTsonga language into the mainstream.

“I can’t believe people tried to tell us we weren’t dope for so long, now they see…” she says.

She is an artist for the people and whenever she performs, her energy is infectious.

She has played at festivals such as Afropunk, opened for artists like Travis Scott and Jidenna, and not to mention one of her highlight performances at the Global Citizen Festival in South Africa late last year.

The rising star was born Maya Wegerif in the small village of Shirley, deep in the province of the Limpopo province of South Africa.

After living in Tanzania, Senegal, and the US, Madjozi is fluent in Kiswahili, French and almost every South African language, making her pretty much a true global citizen.

Apart for her talented vocals, she also has a sense of style to match.

Her inspiration comes from the traditional Tsonga culture.

She has also teamed up with local designers to bring her first line of merchandise to fans, awakening her entrepreneurial spirit.

Her goal is to bring her culture to the world, which she continues to do so, staying true to her roots.

She was nominated for a BET Awards for Best New International Act, and recently bagged the Newcomer Of The Year and female artist of the year at the South African Music Awards.

Sarah Owusu, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

27. Sarah Owusu, 28, Ghana

Artist and Painter

It all started in the summer of 2012 when living in London, and Sarah Owusu was diagnosed with Bell’s palsy which left the left side of her face paralyzed.

“During this very dark period of my life, I wouldn’t leave my house except for my hospital appointments, and a few weeks into my diagnosis, I got a sudden urge to paint although I hadn’t created anything for years,” she tells FORBES AFRICA.

After gaining the courage to paint, she went to a cheap pound store and bought two blank canvases, cheap paint and brushes.

Owusu’s passion for art grew as she noticed the lack of black female artists in the industry.

One of the biggest highlights for the self-taught artist was last year when she was invited to present two of her paintings of the President of Ghana, Nana Akufo-Addo, at the Africa Business Summit in London Business School.

“My future plans are to have my artwork exhibited across the African continent, starting from my place of origin, Ghana,” she says.

Abisola Akintunde, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

28. Abisola Akintunde, 28, Nigeria

Founder and Creative Director: MakeupbyAshabee and Beelashes

They say beauty is in the eyes of the beholder, but for Abisola Akntunde, beauty is also in the brush stroke and makeup palette.

For three weeks, she worked for a dental clinic before deciding to venture into makeup full-time.

In 2012, she worked with M-Net Africa Magic doing make-up on a TV set while trying to set up her two businesses, Makeupbyashabee and Beelashes.

Soon enough, she started receiving bookings outside of her job at M-Net and had to quit and focus full-time on her entrepreneurial journey.

“It was a very bold and scary step because I was afraid I was going to leave a steady income for something not certain but like they say, ‘don’t be afraid’,” she tells FORBES AFRICA.

Akintunde took the bold step, bought her own car and set up her own studio and the rest has been a transformation for the better.

Since inception, MakeupbyAshabee has made up over 200 brides across Africa including Nigeria, Ghana, Congo, South Africa and Kenya.

While with Beelashes, she says she sells over 5,000 units of beauty lashes per quarter.

Akintunde has hired a staff of 20 and has trained over 50 interns between 2017 and now.

As part of her philanthropic efforts, she has partnered with the Archbishop Vining Anglican Church in Lagos to train young women in the art of makeup.

She has also partnered with AfribeautyHub to empower young women in Ibadan in Oyo State, Nigeria, on makeup.

“The next goal at MakeupbyAshabee is to learn permanent makeup, the art of micro-blading and ombré brows,” she says.

By doing this, she plans to bring something new to the table as micro-blading is an eyebrow embroidery procedure categorized under permanent makeup lasting for up to two years.

Yaa Bonsu, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Mombo Subira

29. Yaa Bonsu, 28, Kenya

Fashion stylist and Creative

In 2017, Yaa Bonsu met international model Naomi Campbell who told her to believe in herself, and then signed a copy of her Vogue magazine.

Bonsu took her advice and has been climbing the international ladder in fashion since.

“I remember flipping through Vogue magazines when I was 15 years old and being engrossed in this glossy world. After I watched the film, The Devil Wears Prada, I knew the fashion world belonged to me,” she says.

Today, she spends her days with runway models, designers and in the thick of fashion shoots for some of those glossy magazines.

In 2016, she relocated to Dubai where her career in the fashion industry took off.

She connected with industry powerhouses such as Naomi Campbell, Zeynab El-Helw and Shashi Menon.

She has had the opportunity to style an advertorial for the luxury brand Fendi, SS19, in April 2019.

The same year, she produced a fashion editorial for Revolution magazine that featured high-end jewelry – Dior, de GRISOGONO, Bvlgari and Piaget, an achievement she says she is most proud of.

She has set her goals on becoming an internationally-renowned fashion powerhouse joining the leagues of icons Victoria Beckham, Edward Enninful and Vanessa Kingori.

Paola Audrey Ndengue, member of Forbes Africa 30 under 30 class of 2019. Picture: Supplied

30. Paola Audrey Ndengue, 29, Cote d’Ivoire

Host and Producer and Co-founder: FASHIZBLACK

Paola Audrey Ndengue is an entrepreneur and a creative with a higher calling.

Her mission has been to promote the French-speaking African creative scene to the world.

While studying in France, she became a fashion blogger and has since gained 10 years’ experience in digital media.

She is currently the co-founder and creative director of FASHIZBLACK, a magazine focused on black and African fashion, designers, beauty and lifestyle.

And her most recent venture is PANNELLE & Co, a PR creative marketing and content agency in 2013.

She has worked with several international clients and artists such as Kiff No Beat (Côte d’Ivoire), Stanley Enow (Cameroon), Boddhi Satva (Central African Republic) and Canabasse (Senegal).

Both businesses she is involved in led to her being recognized as a finalist at the CNBC Africa All Africa Business Leaders Awards for the Young Business Leader of The Year in West Africa 2014.

Her growth since has been phenomenal and she has featured in numerous publications including Teen Vogue, CNN Africa and Forbes Afrique.

She is currently working on Maybelline’s first pan-African campaign, including several celebrities and influencers from Ghana, South Africa and Nigeria.

She was recently appointed the marketing manager of the first MTV Shuga Côte d’Ivoire, an international show educating young viewers about HIV/AIDS, an opportunity that will enlarge Ndengue’s reach.

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